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The Moorcroft lab combine novel observations (e.g remote sensing data) and mechanistic numerical models to understand and predict dynamics in the terrestrial biosphere.

The majority of the group uses the Ecosystem Demography 2 (ED2) model, which calculates the distribution of different plants and their physical properties and processes based on meteorological drivers Undergraduates Open Research Positions Projects Harvard Life nbsp.The majority of the group uses the Ecosystem Demography 2 (ED2) model, which calculates the distribution of different plants and their physical properties and processes based on meteorological drivers.

This model is applied to ecosystems from Arctic tundra to Mediterranean ecosystems in California to lowland rainforests in the Amazon.Students interested in joining this lab should have a background and/or interest in math and computer science Help me with custom aeronautics thesis Bluebook British 5 pages / 1375 words 9 days.Students interested in joining this lab should have a background and/or interest in math and computer science.Possible projects include: - Using a variety of remote sensing observations to characterize ecosystems Help me with custom aeronautics thesis Bluebook British 5 pages / 1375 words 9 days.Possible projects include: - Using a variety of remote sensing observations to characterize ecosystems.- Use mechanistic models to understand plant biodiversity and its importance on the Earth system - Other relevant projects of student design freehostingprofits.com/thesis.php.

- Use mechanistic models to understand plant biodiversity and its importance on the Earth system - Other relevant projects of student design.

Undergraduate research opportunity in ultra-high throughput directed evolution of enzymes Prof.David Weitz, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Contact: 9 Oxford street, Gordon McKay, room 517, 02139 Cambridge MA, [email protected] , tel.Enzymes or antibodies that are found by screening natural- or in silico-designed- variants do not necessarily have the desired properties (e.

, not specific or fast enough, wrong temperature or pH optima, low yielding expression, etc).Directed evolution is a powerful method to improve these molecules according the need of a specific application, be it academic or industrial.The general approach for directed evolution is: (1) generating variation in the gene of interest, (2) expressing the different variants and (3) selecting the best variant(s).The best variants can then be used in another cycle to create further improved variants.A typical cycle in directed evolution requires 2-3 days and requires a lot of intervention by skilled workers.

Microfluidics is an upcoming field that promises to greatly speed up the selection of enzyme and antibody variants.This technique can operate at ultra-high throughput: in excess of 10 8 reactions per day, greatly accelerating directed evolution.Whereas this miniaturization promises to bring significant cost reductions for directed evolution, genetic library generation has not undergone a similar revolution.This project aims at developing an in vivo mutagenesis method that could fully automate and reduce the duration of library generation to the growth speed of Escherichia coli, reducing the required time for a typical directed evolution scheme from months to days.Skills required: Ideally the student will have some experience with microbiology, molecular genetics or biochemistry.

Learning outcome: This position is a great opportunity to learn general laboratory and research skills in biochemistry, molecular genetics as well as enzyme catalysis.Number of hours: This position has flexible working hours and we can work something out that works with classes.Ideally the workload will be between 10-20 h per week.Mentoring: Applicants will work along side Dr.Compensation: Students will be paid between $13-15 depending on prior experience.In addition students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit (contact Dr.Babakhanyan for more info at [email protected] ).Interested applicants should email their resume to Raoul Rosenthal, [email protected] .The Lichtman lab offers internships to students who have interest in neural circuit analysis, the focus of the lab’s research.

Our aim is to map neural connections at high resolution and describe how they change as the nervous system matures.To achieve this goal, the lab has developed high-throughput techniques to increase the speed and efficiency of acquiring and analyzing big data sets comprised of serial section electron microscopy images.These approaches include a device for automatic collection of very thin nervous system sections, a multi-beam scanning electron microscope for high speed image acquisition, and automated computer-based image segmentation and visualization.Using these tools, the lab has collected a neuromuscular junction (NMJ) connectome of nearly 40 TBs from a day-old mouse.The mapping of all the motor axon projections in one muscle is the current goal.

Such a map will help elucidate how axons branch reorganize by pruning and synapse formation to generate the mature patterns of motor control of skeletal muscle fibers.The lab is looking for students to participate in this study to reveal the complete neuromuscular connetome.Though the internships are unpaid, this experience will provide opportunities to work with scientists at Harvard University, offer experience to learn advance techniques in data acquisition and analysis in the field of Connectomics, and improve your skills in applying computer assisted approaches to image processing and data analysis.Successful candidates will be intensively trained by lab members to learn the fundamentals of connectomics and the application of a suite of programs including ImageJ, VAST and 3d StudioMax.Interns will be responsible for segmentation, reconstruction and analysis of their own part of neuromuscular connectome data by use of these techniques.

Students who have biology, medicine, or computer science backgrounds are encouraged to apply, but this is not mandatory.To apply, please submit your resume to [email protected] .Maintenance of immortalized cell lines and primary cell cultures.Processing of RNA and cDNA where appropriate Transfection and running of qPCR to assess knockout efficiency Skills required: advanced chemistry courses in high school or college.No prior research experience is required.

Learning Outcome: Laboratory skills, Research skills, Data analysis method, Presentations, Scientific writing, Appropriate cell culture technique, Tissue and cell isolation, Lab note keeping and lab notebook management Number of hours students are expected to work: 10-15 hrs/week Length of the project: Negotiable Mentoring: Postdoctoral fellow will mentor students How often are mentorship meetings etc.Trainees should participate in regular lab meetings to gain a better understanding of the overall lab activity and meet others working in the lab.Funding: Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships (contact Dr.Babakhanyan at [email protected] for more info) or register for a research course credit.

Email your resume and cover letter addressed to Dr.Vijay Kuchroo, stating why you are interested in working as an intern to: [email protected] October 13, 2017 Undergraduate Research Position in Nutrition and Growth in Preterm Infants, Department Pediatric Newborn Medicine, Brigham & Women’s Hospital Mandy Brown Belfort, MD, MPH Department of Pediatric Newborn Medicine, Brigham & Women’s Hospital 221 Longwood Avenue, Boston MA 02115 Preterm birth is a major public health problem affecting over 10% of U.Although very preterm infants (<32 weeks’ gestation) face multiple medical complications and prolonged hospital stays, survival is now >90% due to major medical advances in the past 2 decades.

Despite these high survival rates, a remaining clinical challenge is the high rate of burdensome health and developmental problems faced by children and families long after they leave the hospital.Because early-life nutrition plays a critical role in the growth and development of multiple organs and tissues (e.brain, kidneys, adipose tissue, lungs), ensuring optimal nutrition during the prolonged stay in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) has great potential to improve long-term outcomes.

Our interdisciplinary group of neonatal researchers and clinicians aims to (1) develop and test novel interventions to improve the nutritional status of preterm infants in the NICU; and (2) implement nutritional practices based on the best available evidence available, using principles of implementation science.

Current ongoing projects include a clinical research study of human milk composition and preterm infant growth, body composition, and brain development; a validation study of a new device to measure the macronutrient content of human milk; and implementation studies following introduction of new clinical guidelines.The undergraduate student will assist with these ongoing projects.Specific tasks may include data collection and analysis, preparation of reports, literature review, assisting with milk sample analysis, and assisting with biorepository management.Additional educational opportunities such as shadowing of clinicians and attendance at departmental lectures are available.Skills required: No prior research experience is necessary.

However, a strong interest in nutrition, pediatrics, maternal/child health, or epidemiology is required.This is an excellent opportunity for a student considering medical school or graduate school in a public health-related field.Learning outcome: Students will learn about the critical role of nutrition in early development, with an emphasis on implications for improving the health of general and clinical populations.Skills learned will include extraction of medical record data, use of REDCap for data and biospecimen management, data analysis for clinical research and quality improvement studies, and systematic literature review using PubMed.Number of hours: A commitment of 8 hours per week for at least 2 semesters is preferred.

Full time summer positions may also be available.Belfort will serve as mentor, meetings will occur weekly.Funding: Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships (contact Dr.Anna Babakhanyan for more info at [email protected] ) or register for a research course credit.

Contact info: Anxiety and Traumatic Stress Disorders Laboratory Center for Depression, Anxiety and Stress Research McLean Hospital, 115 Mill St., Belmont, MA Our lab has a variety of potential projects, and we are willing to try to tailor projects toward student interests.For example: We have skin conductance data from a fear conditioning paradigm that needs to be organized within SPSS.We have partially processed multi-modal imaging data; an interested student could be involved in assisting with processing and quality control of tractography and morphometry data, with an ultimate goal of analyzing the fear conditioning data in relation to the imaging data.Opportunities exist for students to be involved in taking current participants to MRI scan sessions, phone screening individuals with psychiatric disorders, etc.

Skills required: Excellent interpersonal skills are essential.No particular laboratory skills or prior research experience is needed, though individuals with a more advanced background may be able to more quickly progress toward working on more advanced projects.Hours, length of project: Negotiable Mentoring: Elizabeth Olson, Ph.Weekly mentorship meetings are a minimum, though we typically have more frequent contact with mentees.Stipend: Our lab does not have funds to support a student.Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit.

Applying: Please apply by submitting a CV and cover letter to Dr.Christian Rask-Madsen, Vascular Biology and Complications, Joslin Diabetes Center One Joslin Place, Boston, MA 02215, Email: [email protected] The aim of the research will be to characterize the regulation of the intestinal stem cell niche by vascular endothelial cells.Our hypothesis is that vascular endothelial dysfunction in type 2 diabetes changes the vascular niche for intestinal stem cells and causes expansion of the stem cell population.This increases the risk for oncogenic mutations and contribute to the increased risk for colorectal cancer in people with type 2 diabetes.

The student research will use culture of mouse intestinal stem cells and co-culture with vascular endothelial cells.The project may also involve mice with expression of a fluorescent reporter in intestinal stem cells combined with genetic mutations in endothelial cells.Learning outcomes: The student researcher will learn 3D-culture techniques, analysis of RNA and protein expression, and manipulation of gene expression in cell culture.The student will be involved in data analysis and planning of experiments.The goal will be that the student will experience the creativity of experimental research by designing and interpreting experiments independently with input from the mentor as needed.

The student will also have opportunities for presentation at lab meetings at Joslin and at national or international meetings, depending on the data which will be acquired.The student can expect to be an author on manuscripts based on the results.Time Commitment: The student researcher will be expected to work in the lab about 20 hours per week.However, this commitment is flexible and will accommodate periods with increased time demands in the school curriculum.The project will be planned for the duration of the academic year but can be extended depending on results and interest.

Mentoring: The PI will mentor the student daily and be involved or available in planning all experiments.We are a small lab where the advantage is close supervision and daily availability of the PI.Funding: The laboratory does not provide a stipend for this project.Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships (please contact Dr.

Babakhanyan at [email protected] for more info) or register for a research course credit.

Rask-Madsen using the email address above.An initial discussion is without commitment on behalf of the student and can just serve to elaborate on the information given here.Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Mass Eye and Ear Infirmary, Schepens Eye Research Institute PI: Dr.Reza Dana, Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Mass Eye and Ear Infirmary, Schepens Eye Research Institute,/dana Description of the project: Role of regulatory T cells in corneal transplantation.

Duties: Basic wet lab techniques such as PCR and flow cytometry, image processing and data analysis Skills required: no prior biomedical research skills required, basic computer skills required.Learning outcome: basic biomedical research skills, image processing, and data analysis.Hours: minimum 5 hours weekly for minimal 4 weeks.Dana and research postdoc fellows in the lab will mentor students.

Funding: Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships (contact Dr.Anna Babakhanyan for more info at [email protected] ) or register for a research course credit.To apply please email your resume to Ms.Linda Benson Linda [email protected] subject ‘HUROS’.Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute PI: F.

, Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 450 Brookline Avenue, Dana 5th floor Our laboratory investigates human immunology and the development of immune therapies to treat cancer.Two primary areas of potential projects and investigation exist.The first is to conduct screening and functional studies utilizing patietn samples from patietns receiving immune therapy to dissect what characteristics are involved with effective treatment and resistant mechanisms to immune therapy.

This involves standard and developed techniques assessing peripheral blood and biopsied tumor tissues.The second project involved improving our understanding of the interactions of angiogenesis (new blood vessel formation) and immune regulation.Factors that are involved in making new blood vessels suppress particular parts of the immune system.The blood vessels are also the gatekeepers in allowing immune cells to home into the tumor microenvironment.Through various serologic screening methods we are able to identify candidate protein targets that have the potential dual roles of promoting new blood vessel formation (angiogenesis) and at the same time suppress the immune responses against tumors.

The laboratory efforts will involve assessing such factors with the goal to develop combinatorial approaches to treat patietns with cancer.The students with these projects will be conducting experiments to answer these questions.This work would include and not limited to cell culture, immune assessments including flow cytometry, immuno-blotting, cytokine functional assays, ELISAs, ELISPOTs.It would be expected that the students will be taught how to perform these techniques and learn how to conduct this work with supervision.Depending on the interest, a student may lead a project or portion of a project.

The student may also have opportunities to present at lab meetings or other scientific conferences, and become an author on publications.Skills required: No prior research experience is necessary.Learning outcome: The desire is for this experience to provide a foundation for developing laboratory technical skills, scientific methods, and experimental design.In addition, exposure to the field of immunology and immune therapy.Hours: Understanding the schedules of students, this is flexible.

We have a variety of project opportunities where the hours and time commitment can vary while still being productive and educational.It would be important to have some dedicated time period (e.g 3-4 hours) in order to plan and participate in experiments as part of the educational experience.Mentoring: who will be mentoring student day to day, how often are mentorship meetings, etc.The student will have a PhD level staff scientist to guide, oversee, and instruct the daily activities.

The student would meet to review progress and for teaching every 1-2 weeks with the laboratory lead.Funding: A moderate stipend may be possible and happy to discuss.Encourage if interested and time permissive to consider research course credit with committed time for scientific development or Harvard fellowships such as PRISE and HCRP (contact Dr.Babakhanyan at [email protected] for more info).Please feel free to email inquiries and resume if available to Dr.

Hodi at Stephen [email protected] research assistant position, Dr.Williams lab, MGH We are looking for a student interested in animal behavior and neurophysiology.Our lab probes the mechanisms by which complex cognitive processes are computed by neurons in the mammalian brain, particularly focusing on questions involving social and group decision making.

The projects in the labuse mice and monkeys as animal models for both normal and abnormal behavior.

Depending on your specific interests, together we will decide which project is the best fit for you.Your duties will primarily include animal care, running animal behavioral assays, collecting electrophysiological recording data, performing basic histology, and analyzing behavioral and neuronal data.We expect you to be in lab at least 10 hours per week, preferably in blocks of more than 3 hours, but this is flexible.Some background in animal behavior, cognitive sciences, and computer programming (Matlab, R, or Python) are helpful but not essential.The lab environment is relaxed, friendly, and very supportive; regardless of your assignment, you will learn from other projects, as we interact and discuss on a daily basis.

You will also be expected to present at weekly lab meetings/journal clubs and give poster presentations or talks at undergraduate research days.If desired, you will also have an opportunity to do a thesis project in the lab.For more information, feel free to shoot us an email or visit the lab website at/ If interested, please submit a resume and a short cover letter to Dr.Raymundo Baez at [email protected] Lance Johnson at [email protected] .Hidde Ploegh Co- Mentor: Ross Cheloha, PhD ( [email protected] ) Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine at Boston Children’s Hospital (Karp Family Research Building).Study of the cell biology of protein ubiquitination using new tools and devices.This project focuses on developing a new method to characterize protein posttranslational modifications (ubiquitination) in live cells.Regulation of ubiquitination has important implications in cellular protein quality control as well as for many diseases.This project will require bacterial protein expression and purification, cell culture using mammalian cell lines, and synthetic organic chemistry.

This project extends from previously published work from the Ploegh lab: Skills required: None.All enthusiastic students encouraged to apply.Learning outcomes: You will gain laboratory skills (protein expression and purification, synthetic chemistry, mammalian cell culture), research skills (study design, data analysis), and data presentation experience.Hours per week required: Minimum of 10, but flexible on timing.Minimum of semester long commitment, with (preferred) option to extend beyond semester.

Mentorship: Daily contact with supervisor (Ross Cheloha, PhD).Biweekly interactions with principal investigator.Monthly progress updates are expected and a presentation to the laboratory will be given at the end of the research experience.Funding: No funding from lab available at beginning of research experience.Students are encouraged to apply with the HCRP for fellowships (contact Dr.

Babakhanyan at [email protected] for more info).Possibility for funding from the laboratory following initial research experience.Please email a resume, a course schedule/availability, and a brief introduction to Ross Cheloha ( [email protected] ) for consideration.The project is trying to understand how protein degradation is regulated in eukaryotic cells, using integrative approaches.Ubiquitylation pathways generate a large number of ubiquitin topologies on protein substrates, which must be read by the proteasome and converted to the rate of protein degradation.

The 26S proteasome is a 66-subunit protein complex.Previous works, including the structural studies in our group, revealed molecular details of this machine and its conformational heterogeneity.However, how those structural features enable accurate selection of its targets and efficient degradation is poorly understood.The lab has developed single-molecule fluorescent methods and quantitative mass spectrometry approaches to understand this intricate protein degradation system. Students will learn basic techniques in protein biochemistry and use single-molecule methods in a microfluidic system to study the dynamics of protein complexes.

Students are expected to work semi-independently and get involved in multiple projects in the lab. Explorative projects are also highly encouraged.Understanding the Molecular Mechanism and Developing Therapies in Neuromuscular Diseases PI Information:Vandana A Gupta, PhD, Division of Genetics, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, NRB 168A, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, MA 02115 Ph: 617-525-4452Project Description: This project is focused on understanding the role of novel genes in neuromuscular development and disease pathology.This is a research position that will involve cloning, bacterial cultures, mammalian cell culture, generation of transgenic zebrafish lines and performing small chemical screens to develop therapeutics.We are looking for a self-motivated and creative student to work in a team as well as independently.

No prior research experience is required.Project Timeline: We are looking for a time commitment of a minimum of 10 hours/week for 6-12 months.Skills Required: Previous experience with molecular biology or cell culture techniques would be great.However, students with no prior research experience are also encouraged to apply.Learning Outcome: Research design, experimental skills, data analysis, research presentations, writing scientific papers.

Gupta will be mentoring students and will be meeting atleast once per week with students.Regular mentoring and training for new skills will be provided.Funding: Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit.

Contact: Email your resume and research interests to Dr.

Gupta at [email protected] work ​in the Division of Rheumatology at BIDMC in the Longwood Medical Area.We study autoimmune diseases (mainly Lupus), specifically molecular mechanisms underlying the role of T cells in disease - basic immunology research with a translational focus - human/patients and animal research.This would be suitable for current juniors or seniors who are interested in conducting independent research during the school year and/or also during the summer.his would be ideal for those who are interested in pursuing a career in medicine or research.Funding: For this opportunity, we do not offer funding, and therefore the student would need to apply for Harvard funding such as HCRP (please contact Dr.

Babakhanyan for more info at [email protected] ), and we would be happy to help in the application process.Contact: Vaishali Moulton MD, PhD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center 3 Blackfan Circle, CLS-948, Boston, MA 02115, 617-735-4186, [email protected] Research Opportunities in the Ploegh lab PI: Dr. Hidde Ploegh, Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Division of Molecular Biology, Department of Medicine, Boston Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School @ , Lab address: Karp family building, 6th floor The Ploegh lab seeks to recruit motivated and talented undergraduates to be trained in laboratory and research skills by assisting experienced researchers in their ongoing efforts.The Ploegh lab offers a multidisciplinary research environment.Undergraduate students would support projects focusing on post-translational protein modifications in disease, in vivo PET imaging of cancer, Ebola and HPV pathogenesis or cancer immunotherapy using CART cells.

Prior research experience is preferred but not required.Students will learn how to perform biomedical research and be trained in relevant laboratory techniques.Students will gain experience in study design, data analysis and scientific data presentation.Mentoring will be provided on a 1-on-1 basis from graduate and postdoctoral researchers.Number of hours as well as length of the project to be determined by mutual agreement.

Funding: The laboratory does not provide funds to pay undergraduate researchers.However, interested students are encouraged and supported to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or to register for a research course credit if applicable (contact Dr.Babakhanyan at [email protected] for more info).Interested students should submit their CV and a brief statement of their research interests to @PI: Dr.David Corey, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Neurobiology, Harvard Medical School Within the inner ear are fast, sensitive receptor cells, working on a scale of microseconds and nanometers to convert the mechanical stimulus of sound into electrical signals that the brain can understand.

In recent years, this process has become better understood, as many proteins involved in the submicroscopic mechanotransduction complex have been identified.If mutated, most of these proteins cause hereditary deafness.Our group in the Neurobiology Department at Harvard Medical School is working to understand the complex, with a combination of electrophysiology, 3D electron microscopy, biochemistry, and single-protein mechanics.We have an opening for one or two students to join this effort.Specifically, we need to understand how the mechanotransduction proteins assemble into a functional complex.

We use state-of-the-art biochemical and biophysical techniques such as biolayer interferometry, multi-angle light scattering, microscale thermophoresis and isothermal calorimetry, as well as more conventional methods like co-immunoprecipitation, to understand how different proteins interact with each other to form the mechanotransduction apparatus.Students will help us with DNA cloning, protein synthesis, and cell culture to generate a library of proteins.Students will then participate in the collection and analysis of biophysical and biochemical interaction data to generate an interaction model.Interested candidates please email to Dr.Elizabeth (Lisa) Henske, MD, Professor of Medicine Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School Location: 45 Francis Street, Thorn Building, (Elevator D) Room 826, Boston, MA 02115 Project Description: The Henske Laboratory is focused on the cell biology and biochemistry of rare genetic diseases, including Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC) and lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM).Henske is a medical oncologist who follows LAM and TSC patients in addition to directing a research laboratory.

Our mission is to translate research discoveries into improved care as quickly as possible, to improve the lives of those affected by these devastating diseases.TSC is an autosomal dominant syndrome causing seizures, autism, and tumors of the brain, heart, kidney, skin, and lung.LAM is a destructive, progressive cystic lung disease that affects almost exclusively women and can lead to lung collapse and respiratory failure.LAM is caused by TSC2 gene mutations in benign tumor cells that metastasize to the lung.The TSC proteins inhibit the activity of the mammalian target of Rapamycin (mTOR) kinase.

Some of the research topics covered in the lab: • Employing high-throughput screening methodologies to identify novel therapies for TSC and LAM.• Developing relevant in vivo models that recapitulate the clinical manifestations of TSC and LAM • Understanding how benign-appearing LAM cells metastasize to the lungs • Understanding the role of estrogen in the female-predominance of LAM • Studying how nutrients, such as lipids, glucose, and amino acids, are utilized by tumor cells that are deficient in the TSC2 protein • Analyzing data sets from clinical trials in LAM Links to published manuscripts and reviews describing our work: Skills required: Prior research experience preferred but not required.Learning outcome: students will acquire skills in experimental design, experimental techniques, lab data analysis, presentations, and scientific writing.If warranted based on their contributions, students will be co-authors on scientific manuscripts.Number of hours: negotiable Mentoring: Mentoring will be primarily provided by postdoctoral fellows in the laboratory.

The student will also have regular meetings with Dr.Henske, and attend weekly lab meetings and journal clubs and will have opportunities to present at the lab meetings and journal clubs.Funding: The Laboratory does not have funds to pay student stipends, but students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit (contact Dr.Babakhanyan at [email protected] for more info).

Henske at ([email protected] ) with a cover letter including a brief outline of your interests, goals, and anticipated time availability.Ziv Williams, Department of Neurosurgery, Massachusetts General Hospital.55 Fruit St, Boston, MA Our lab probes the mechanisms by which complex cognitive processes are computed by neurons in the mammalian brain, particularly focusing on questions involving social and group decision making.The projects in the lab use mice and monkeys as animal models for both normal and abnormal behavior.Depending on your specific interests, together we will decide which project is the best fit for the student.

Your duties will primarily include animal care, running animal behavioral assays, collecting electrophysiological recording data, performing basic histology, and analyzing behavioral and neuronal data.Skills required: Some background in animal behavior, cognitive sciences, and computer programming (Matlab, R, or Python) are helpful but not essential.No matter the amount of prior experience, we will work together to develop the student’s research skill set.The lab environment is relaxed, friendly, and very supportive; regardless of your assignment, the student will learn from other projects, as we interact and discuss on a daily basis.Learning outcome: The student will learn to work with animals, data analysis, basic electronics, and programming.

Additionally, the student will be expected to present at weekly lab meetings/journal clubs and give poster presentations or talks at undergraduate research days.If desired, the student will also have an opportunity to do his/her thesis project in the lab.

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Number of hours: We expect the student to be in lab at least 10 hours per week, preferably in blocks of more than 3 hours, but this is flexible.The timeframe will depend on the project and its progress.Mentoring: The student will be mentored primarily by Dr Sitemap Get professional essay writing help on our website at a good nbsp.

Mentoring: The student will be mentored primarily by Dr.

Raymundo Baez, a post-doc, and William Li, an MD/PhD student.We will meet and discuss on a daily basis, and the student will have informal meeting with Ziv on a weekly basis Where to get a college writing help aeronautics thesis single spaced 7 days Bluebook PhD.We will meet and discuss on a daily basis, and the student will have informal meeting with Ziv on a weekly basis.Funding: We encourage students to apply to fellowships (such as HCRP, please contact Dr.Babakhanyan at [email protected] for more info) for stipends as well as register for course credit.Students will need to submit a resume and a short cover letter to Dr.

Raymundo Baez at [email protected] and William Li at [email protected] .Location: Wyss Institute at CLS (Longwood), Website: Genetically programmable microorganisms will be used as platform to engineer hybrid systems with different inorganic nanomaterials.The goal of this project is to combine the functional properties of inorganics (i.) with biological materials (sequence programmability, catalysis, etc.) in a platform suitable for scalable manufacturing.In particular, we are interested in repurposing the bacterial cell surface and its biofilm proteins as scaffolds for the assembly of various components in order to create hybrid materials with applications in catalysis, photosynthesis, and environmental remediation., Skills required: No specific skills needed.

Learning outcome: Participation with cutting-edge research project, laboratory skills, research skills: study design, data analysis method, presentations, scientific writing, etc.Number of hours: Around 3 months or longer required.Miguel Suastegui will be the mentors for this project.Mentors and student(s) will be working together at the lab to ensure effective communication and safety.Funding: Lab does not provide student stipend, but candidates are encouraged to apply for fellowships (ex.Babakhanyan at [email protected] for more info) and research course credit.

Junling Guo ( @ ) to apply for this position.Please send your CV and describe the reasons why you are interested in the project.PI: Hamid Sabet, Department of Radiology, Mass General Hospital.

 [email protected] Description of the project and duties: In our imaging instrumentation lab, we focus development of high-performance and advanced radiation detectors by rigorously studying and addressing some of the fundamental obstacles of today’s imaging systems.One specific research area in our lab is fabrication of new category of radiation detectors using ultra short laser pulses for PET, SPECT, and CT imaging applications.The current projects are: - Development of high sensitivity and high resolution brain PET (includes detector design and fabrication and characterization, simulation studies, hardware integration, and image reconstruction) - Development of sub-mm resolution small animal PET (includes hardware development, simulation studies, system modeling, and image reconstruction) - New design for cardiac SPECT system (includes detector fabrication, collimator design and fabrication, system modeling, and image reconstruction) - Development of scintillator-based photon counting CT detector (includes detector modeling, scintillator fabrication and characterization) - Development of intraoperative positron+gamma probe for surgical applications (involves with detector fabrication, integration with electronics boards, testing) - GPU programing and machine learning for performance optimization of detectors fabricated by using Laser-Induced Optical Barriers technique Skills required: Other than logical thinking and enthusiasm, no other skill is required! Computer programing in MATLAB, LabVIEW, Python, etc is a plus.Students will learn all the necessary skills in the lab.

Learning outcome: Students will gain knowledge about nuclear medicine imaging modalities and will have chance to experiment with fundamental and high-end detector components of PET, and SPECT systems.

They will also learn how to design an experiment or simulation, write manuscripts and research proposals.Number of hours: As much as they are willing to work.Length of the project: It depends on the project, some span over multiple years.If the student contributes to the project, his/her name will be added to the research paper(s) even if his/her time in the lab is finished and the project keeps ongoing.Mentoring: The PI and current lab members will be helping the student to accomplish his/her work.

Lab meetings and one-to-one meeting between the PI and the student will be held.But the PI's door is always open for any questions or concerns.Funding: Students are encouraged to apply to HCRP or course credit (contact.Babakhanyan at [email protected] for more info).

Email your resume to the PI and a small statement on why you would like to join the lab, and for how long.Also describe what your expectations are.Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr.Pu Lab, Boston Children’s Hospital PI information: William Pu, [email protected] , Boston Children’s Hospital, 300 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA 02115, Project description: Research assistants will participate in projects in three main areas: (1) regulation of gene expression and transcription in cardiovascular development and disease, (2) cardiac regeneration, and (3) engineered tissue models of human heart disease.

We use both genetically engineered mouse models and human induced pluripotent stem cells.The techniques that we use include molecular biology, bioinformatics, bioengineering, developmental biology, and cardiac physiology.Skills required: A background in basic biology.Specific laboratory skills are not required.Learning outcome: Research assistants will gain experience in many lab techniques and in the proper design and interpretation of experiments.

Funding: Depends of level of experience and commitment.Interested students should email [email protected] with a statement of interest, time commitment, and CV.Katja Taute, Rowland Institute at Harvard 100 Edwin H.

, Cambridge, MA 02142,Bacteria show an amazing diversity in strategies for locomotion and chemotaxis, but only a small number of these are understood.Many involve propulsion using helical appendages called flagella that are rotated by a motor at their base.Number, shape, and location of the flagella vary between species for unknown reasons and with largely unknown consequences.The Taute lab studies novel bacterial motility strategies and aims to unravel the underlying physics and ecology.

The successful candidate will contribute to revealing the mechanisms underlying motility and chemotaxis in a species with an unusual flagellar architecture.She/He will establish a flagellar tethering experiment to characterize the motor’s rotation behavior in wildtype and mutant strains.Skills required: Curiosity and enthusiasm for interdisciplinary science are a must.The following skills will be used in the project.It is expected that the candidate would bring along some of them and pick up the others: basic wet lab skills, bacterial culturing and handling, phase contrast microscopy, data acquisition, image analysis, Matlab programming, critical data analysis, interpretation, and presentation.

Learning outcome: laboratory skills as listed above, research skills: study design, data analysis method, presentations Number of hours: We are looking for a student willing to work 8-10 hours per week during the fall semester, ideally 1-2 sessions per week.Mentoring: The PI will assume most the mentoring work directly, with occasional help from a postdoc.Typically, the undergrad will interact with the PI at least once per week, and data reviews will typically take place roughly once a month.Funding: We encourage students to seek out mutually beneficial opportunities for course credit and external funding (Harvard fellowships: HCRP), but alternatively can provide a wage of $15/hr.Candidates should email their CV, their transcript, and a statement of motivation to Katja Taute at [email protected] .

What are your interests, why would you like to join the lab, what skills would you like to learn, and which do you bring along?Sudha Biddinger MD/PhD, Department of Medicine/Boston Children’s Hospital, 16027 CLSB, The student will participate in research on insulin signaling, metabolism, and diabetes.This will include learning specific wet lab techniques (examples include Western blotting, cloning, real-time PCR, and lipid extraction), participating in lab meetings, and working with other team members.Interested students will be given the opportunity to develop their own projects.The overall goals will be to learn about diabetes research and ideally to co-author a publication.Skills required: Any molecular biology or computational skills are welcome, but not required.

Learning outcome: laboratory skills, research skills: study design, data analysis method, presentations, scientific writing, etc.Ideally we are looking for a student who will work with us over the course of 2-3 years.Mentoring: You will be mentored on a daily basis by a senior graduate student or post-doc who will help you with the design and execution of your experiments, and then weekly with the PI, who will help with Funding: Negotiable.

Please send an email describing any previous research experience, how much time you can commit, and what you hope to get out of this research experience ( [email protected] ).

If you have a CV handy, please send that as well.Molecular signals controlling retinal neuron and optic nerve regeneration The student will be involved in using retinal neuron or progenitor cell cultures to examine for proteins or epigenetic compounds that affect the proliferation, differentiation, fate determination or neurite outgrowth.Candidate compounds will be further validated and studied in vivo using genetically modified mouse models.Thus, student may also be working with mice carrying defined genetic or epigenetic mutations to look for phenotypes of neural development or functional defects.Skills required: Not required, but experience with cell culture or PCR preferred Learning outcome: Laboratory and research skills, including study design, data analysis, cellular and molecular biology bench techniques, presentations, scientific writing.

Number of hours: negotiable Mentoring: Instructor and postdoctoral fellows will be mentoring the student day to day, and weekly (or more frequent if desired) individual mentorship meeting Funding: Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit (contact Dr.Babakhanyan at [email protected] for more info).Dong Feng Chen at Dongfeng [email protected] Contact information: Dong Feng Chen, MD, PhD; Email: Dongfeng [email protected] Tel: 617-912-7490; Dept.of Ophthamlology, Harvard Medical School, Schepens Eye Research Institute of Massachusetts Eye and Ear, 20 Staniford Street, Boston, MA 02114Biological sensory systems have evolved over millions of years to very efficiently evaluate complex stimuli and deliver pre-processed information to the brain.

Integrating bio-inspired concepts in electronic sensor networks provides the possibility to create artificial sensor networks with unprecedented efficiency and capabilities.An additional important characteristic of pressure sensors in biological skin is that their electrical response adapts to the stimulus over time.This adaptation is best implemented in artificial systems at the sensor level rather than in the electronics to minimize energy consumption.Toward this end, filament printing can be used to prepare composite materials with anisotropic mechanical and electrical characteristics.

Due to viscoelastic deformation in the matrix materials, composites can be prepared that have different electrical responses to pressure in different directions, allowing the implementation of time-varying, adaptive characteristics.Mentoring process is flexible based on the preference of the student.Likely meetings could be every two weeks.Funding: students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP for funding or register for a research course credit (contact Dr.

Babakhanyan at [email protected] for more info).Interested students should email their resume to Alex Chortos at [email protected], Anesthesia Department, Boston Children’s in Waltham PI: Nadia Barakat, PhD (PI), Anesthesia Department, 781-216-1199 (lab number), located in Boston Children’s in Waltham, Description of the project and duties: This research study is looking to investigate the effects of chronic pain on children with spinal cord injury (specifically myelitis).We implement advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques in order to do so.The research intern will work with our team and gain experience conducting various image analysis experiments.Responsibilities may include image analysis, data entry and statistical analysis.

Please feel free to read the retrospective review to learn more about the challenges faced in imaging and treating patients with demyelinating diseases (PMID: 26509120).Skills required: Programming experience required, experience with image processing applications preferred, proficiency in Microsoft Office suite required.Learning outcome: Research skills such as study design, data analysis methods, presentations (if abstract accepted), scientific writing (abstracts, paper), etc.Number of hours students are expected to work: At least 20 hours per week.Length of the project: at least 1 year, somewhat flexible Mentoring: Nadia Barakat (the PI) will be mentoring the student and she will be meeting with him/her weekly at the very least.

Funding: The lab does not provide any funds and the student is encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for research course credit (contact Dr.Babakhanyan at [email protected] for more info).The student must be receiving school credit for this internship.What information students need to submit and contact information for submitting this information: Please submit a resume to [email protected] (Subject line should read: “Last name: Internship”)The Planetary Health Undergraduate Scholars Fellowship Program 2018 Planetary health is an interdisciplinary field focused on understanding and quantifying the human health impacts of the accelerating transformation of most of Earth’s natural systems including the climate system, land use and land cover, and marine systems (for more details, see here).We are excited to offer this fellowship opportunity sponsored by the Henry David Thoreau Foundation that will sponsor up to five scholars selected across a range of disciplines to 1) receive training in planetary health science; 2) travel to Madagascar to receive hands-on experience in planetary health research; and 3) learn how to create policy impact by preparing presentations, capstone reports, or policy briefs on the research undertaken in Madagascar.

Our desire is that students from across the FAS campus engage in this fellowship program, including anthropology, African studies, computer science, ecology, environmental science, global health, economics, government, visual studies, medicine, and journalism.The team of selected scholars will be advised by Dr.Christopher Golden, who is the Associate Director of the Planetary Health Alliance, a Research Scientist at the School of Public Health, and who has been working in Madagascar for the past 18 years investigating the intersection of environmental change and human health.During the Spring 2018 semester, the team will be conducting background research and preparing for the summer field research in Madagascar.The research will be challenge-oriented, allowing us to draw from each of our disciplinary backgrounds and create a cohesive approach to addressing a problem.

Potential research topics include, but are not limited to: 1) fisheries management and food security in the Antongil Bay of Madagascar; 2) eco-epidemiology of malaria and other vector-borne diseases in Madagascar; 3) health system improvement and disease surveillance in Northeastern Madagascar; and 4) poultry interventions to solve the bushmeat crisis in Makira National Park.Golden’s long-term engagement with various governmental and non-governmental partners, we have the opportunity to make a real-world impact.For a brief video synopsis of the work (and to see the beautiful area where you will be working!), please see National Geographic’s 3-minute video.For an introduction to the work of Madagascar Health and Environmental Research (MAHERY), and of our National Geographic blog series featuring an introduction to the program and the voices of our current fellows.

Requirements: - Students will be required to attend weekly meetings during the Spring Semester 2018 - Students are required to take ESPP 90D: An Introduction to Planetary Health - Students will be required to attend a 4-week research trip to Madagascar during the summer of 2018 (likely June 1- July 1) - Students will be required to complete a capstone project (including a presentation, original analysis, creative report/visual exhibition, press report, or policy brief) in the Fall semester 2019 - Students will be asked periodically to facilitate small on-campus projects with the Planetary Health Alliance Benefits: - Airfare (r/t to Madagascar will be covered) - Lodging and group meal costs will be covered in Madagascar - All local transportation in country will be covered - Students will receive focused mentorship by Dr.Golden and the MAHERY team in the development of their capstone project To apply: Please submit a 1 page cover letter and CV to Dr.The cover letter should include information about your disciplinary background, why you are interested in this fellowship, and how you hope to engage in planetary health science in the future.

22, 2017: Final decisions given to students, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Institute, McLean Hospital The Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Institute (OCDI) at McLean Hospital is accepting applications for Student Visitors and/or Academic Credit Students interested in receiving clinical research training.

The student will work with Martha Falkenstein, PhD, Jacob Nota, PhD.Jason Krompinger, PhD, and Jason Elias, PhD, members of the research and clinical staff and faculty in Harvard Medical School.The student will be a part of the OCDI’s ongoing clinical research examining mechanisms underlying OCD and related conditions, as well as the effectiveness of our intensive/residential cognitive behavioral treatment program.The OCDI’s research mission is to excel in naturalistic clinical research that will directly improve the effectiveness of treatment for OCD and related conditions.For more information about the type of work we do, please see: /biography/jason-elias This position would be an excellent fit for applicants interested in obtaining doctoral training in clinical or counseling psychology or psychiatry, and/or preparation for research assistant positions after graduation.

Mentorship is an important part of our mission, and our previous students have been accepted into top graduate schools and earned authorship on presentations and papers.Principal experiences include: assisting in data management and archival data collection tasks related to the research program assisting with literature searches, manuscript preparation, and presentations participating in weekly research meetings.The student will meet with the principal investigators in both one-on-one and group formats No prior research experience is required.Time commitment of at least 8 hours per week is required.We are located at the North Belknap building on McLean’s campus, accessible via MBTA 73 bus or Fitchburg Line commuter rail to Waverley Square stop.

McLean is a short walk or is accessible via the McLean shuttle.Please note that we do not have the funds to pay students’ stipends and encourage students to apply for any relevant Harvard fellowships or register for research course credit (please contact Dr.Babakhanyan for more information about fellowships at [email protected] ).To apply, please send CV/resume to: Martha Falkenstein, Ph. We will begin reviewing applicants for Fall semester immediately.PI: Professor Colleen Cavanaugh, Organismic and Evolutionary Biology Supervisor: Postdoctoral Fellow Joey Pakes Nelson, [email protected] General description: In nutrient limited systems, such as dark caves in which landlocked marine layer flows beneath a freshwater layer, one would expect few animals to thrive.Yet, some extreme caves have inexplicably large biomasses of shrimp and members of the Remipedia, a rare crustacean class discovered in 1981.Why and what is feeding all of these animals? Microbes!! Field and laboratory studies by Pakes Nelson combine both microbial and animal evolutionary ecology to better understand the evolution of communities and relationships between microbes and crustaceans in these systems.

While the majority of her work focuses on largely inaccessible habitats across Mexico and the Caribbean, she has recently developed a project in United States freshwater cave systems.Combined, this research asks: What are the patterns and drivers of community structure in underwater caves? What fuels underwater cave communities? How do cave-adapted species and communities evolve? Selected students may work on one of the following projects: Biogeography of cave crustaceans: This project uses molecular biology techniques and statistical analyses to ask questions like: What is the diversity of shrimp in Mexican caves? How did these lineages evolve and spread? DNA extraction, PCR, sequence generation for analysis of shrimp phylogeography and rates of dispersal.Work in excel, ArchGIS/GOOGLE EARTH, genbank and literature searches are likely.(The student may also learn phylogenetic and population genetic analyses.) Drivers of Anchialine Cave Community Structure: While cave diving has only been popular since the 1970s and safe diving practices were not developed until much later, caves has been appreciated as biological hotspots since the Voyage of the Beagle.

This project aims to combine early and recent research to answer questions about known caves like: Where are they? What geologic and chemical characteristics do they share? Who lives inside of them? Help us create and catalogue of cave communities using library science in person and on line.Then, mine data from these works and catalogue this knowledge in excel Finally, perform statistical analyses to test hypotheses about where we find the most biodiversity and why we see these patterns.Skills needed: or molecular biology experience are required.For project 2: No experience is necessary, but familiarity with google scholar, pubmed or Hollis is a plus! For all projects the following would be desirable, but is not essential: Coursework covering: evolution, invertebrate biology, microbial diversity, biological oceanography, geochemistry, or ecology.A background in one or more of the following: Excel, ArchGIS, Adobe product suite, programming languages (e.

, R, CS50 coursework), would be fantastic.This commitment includes at least 6 hours in lab, an hour of weekly meeting, and on certain weeks an hour to read literature or prepare new protocols at home.Mentorship: Selected students will be trained by and work closely with Postdoctoral Fellow Joey Pakes Nelson, who received her AB at Harvard (Winthrop) and PhD at UC Berkeley.

Techniques used in the laboratory are shared by many environmental, microbial and medical laboratories.Past students who have worked with Pakes Nelson have gone on to graduate school in biology, veterinary, and medical schools and co-authored publications.Most recently, her Harvard mentees have presented work at Harvard, Radcliffe, and international conferences! Mentees have private meetings with Pakes Nelson each week to discuss progress and goals.Undergraduates working in the lab are also encouraged to Cavanaugh Lab meetings to learn from other researchers in the laboratory and to practice presenting when ready! If interested: Please send [email protected] an email with subject line “Interest in Undergraduate Research.” In the body of the email, please let me know why this research interests you and how your background might help our research team.

In addition, please attach a transcript and CV to the email if they are available.Babakhanyan for more information about fellowships at [email protected] .More information about Pakes Nelson Research follows: An article about Pakes Nelson postdoctoral field work:/Publications: J Pakes Nelson**.

(2017) The effect of coral restoration on Caribbean reef fish communities.

(Accepted with minor revisions) Schwentner, M, DJ Combosch, Mambelli, S, PD Brooks, R Sutka, S Hughes, K Finstad, Plexaura flexuosa, in Bermuda.Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology 357:121-127.I started working in coral reefs at Harvard as my thesis project supervised by RM Woollacott and given a love of these low-nutrient (oligotrophic) ecosystems, I recently jumped at the opportunity of advising A Opel’s coral reef undergraduate thesis! -JPNCenter for Stem Cell Therapeutics Imaging The Center for Stem Cell Therapeutics Imaging at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School in Boston, MA is seeking highly motivated undergraduate students interested in oncology research.Our research is based on simultaneously targeting cell death and proliferation pathways in tumor cells in an effort to eradicate both primary and metastatic tumors in the brain using therapeutically engineered stem cells.We have engineered different adult stem cells types to release (i) pro-apoptotic proteins to specifically induce apoptosis in tumor cells; (ii) anti-proliferative nanobodies (ENb) to inhibit tumor cell proliferation; (iii) anti-angiogenic proteins to target blood vessels supplying the tumor; (iv) oncolytic viruses to induce viral oncolysis; and demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of these engineered stem cells both in vitro and in vivo.Inherently linked to our tumor therapy paradigm, we employ fluorescent/bioluminescent imaging markers and optical imaging techniques to track the fate of stem cells and tumor cells in real time in vivo.In an effort to translate these therapeutics into clinical settings, we have developed and utilized immuno-deficient and -competent mouse tumor models that mimic clinical settings of primary tumors and their secondary micro-invasive deposits in the brain.

We offer an excellent training program in a collaborative research environment including molecular biology, stem cell biology, gene delivery to brain tumors, and imaging disciplines.The student interns will be working under guidance from a postdoctoral fellow on a research project and will be supervised by the Principal Investigator leading the project.Requirements: Applicants should be currently enrolled in an undergraduate program within the Greater Boston area, with experience in one or more of the following techniques: stem cell biology, gene cloning, viral vector construction and/or animal surgeries.The student interns are expected to commit at least 15-hours/week during regular academic year and apply for full-time summer internship.They will receive training in various scientific areas including but not limited to experimental design, conduct, data interpretation and analysis, writing scientific reports and manuscripts.

Interested candidates can email the Center Director, Dr.Khalid Shah with a copy of their most recent resume and two letters of recommendation at [email protected] .Location: Brigham and Women’s Hospital Department: Neurosurgery Research Work Location: 60 Fenwood Road, Boston, MA 02115 Duration of Internship: 2 years Funding: please contact Dr.Babakhanyan for more information about fellowships at [email protected] .Location: Harvard School of Dental Medicine, REB 3rd floor, 188 Longwood Avenue, Boston MA Description of the project: We are currently offering an undergraduate research opportunity to investigate the role of Wnt canonical and non-canonical signaling cascades in skeletal development and bone homeostasis.

 WNT signaling is one of the most important developmental signaling pathways that controls cell fate decisions and tissue homeostasis.Not surprising, the last decade has provided abundant data implicating the WNT pathway also in bone development and in the regulation of bone mass.Indeed, rare human mutations together with gain-and loss-of-function approaches in mice have clearly demonstrated that flaws in this pathway lead to altered bone mass.The strength of WNT signaling lies in several feedback mechanisms that control proper signaling and thereby proper responses.

Given that WNT signaling can be targeted for drug development, understanding how we can manipulate the different players within the WNT signaling pathways is a major focus for developing new anabolics for treating bone diseases associate with low bone mass and development defects.In particular, our work on the role of Wnt16 in skeletal homeostasis (Nature Medicine.2014) is of great interest, in that it established that trabecular and cortical bone are differentially regulated.In addition, our most recent work on Sfrp4 (a Wnt signaling antagonist) and skeletal homeostasis published on the New England Journal of Medicine, strengthen the hypothesis of a differential regulation of these two bone compartments by Wnt signaling.

Ongoing studies on the role of Wnt16, Sfrp4 and Rspo3 (a potentiator of Wnt signaling) in skeletal homeostasis are part of the current focus of the lab on Wnt signaling and bone.These studies are currently supported by one NIH grant.Recent publications related to Wnt signaling: 1.WNT signaling in bone homeostasis and disease: from human mutations to treatments., (Co-corresponding Authors) and Ohlsson C.Osteoblast-derived WNT16 represses osteoclastogenesis and prevents cortical bone fragility fractures.

A new WNT on the bone: WNT16, cortical bone thickness, porosity and fractures.Simsek Kiper PO, Saito H, Gori F (Co-First Author), Unger S, Hesse E, Yamana K, Kiviranta R, Solban N, Liu J, Brommage R, Boduroglu K, Bonaf L, Campos-Xavier B, Dikoglu E, Eastell R, Gossiel F, Harshman K, Nishimura G, Girisha KM, Stevenson BJ, Takita H, Rivolta C, Superti-Furga A, Baron R (Co-corresponding Author).Cortical bone fragility insights from SFRP4 deficiency in Pyle’s disease.

Learning outcomes: The successful candidate will be involved in exploring the role of Wnt cascades in skeletalhomeostasis, in particular she/he will be working with mouse models of gain- and loss-of-function of the Wnt signaling.Given that this project requires both in vivo and in vitro studies, the candidate will gain expertise in mouse genetics, cell and molecular biology.

The work performed in the lab will provide the candidate with technical and intellectual skills required to address important hypotheses using molecular, cellular and in vivo approaches and to eventually develop an independent research program at an academic institution.Importantly, the candidate will be in contact with researchers in the division at the bench and beyond.We, in fact, have weekly journal clubs and data meetings presented by postdocs and Ph.The candidate will be also asked to present her/his work.In addition, we have monthly bone research meeting with the accomplished investigators in the field of bone development and skeletal homeostasis from greater scientific communities of the Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School.Mentoring: The candidate will be directly supervised by Dr.Gori and will work in a very dynamic lab which currently includes 4 postdocs, 3 Ph.students, 1 HSDM undergraduate student and 3 research assistants.Gori will be meeting with the candidate as much as it is needed.These interactions will be focused on experimental design, data analysis, review of the work, constructive discussion on the next step to take and scientific writing.Skills required: Research experience in cell and molecular biology is a plus but it is not required.

Time: The candidate is expected to be in the lab at least 3 times a week, 3 to 4 hs/day.However, this time is negotiable and will depend on the candidate’ duties with the school deadlines (exams and finals).Funding: Unfortunately, at this time, the lab cannot provide any funds to pay student’s stipend.Students are, therefore, encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit (contact Dr.Babakhanyan at [email protected] for more information on fellowships).

, Assistant Professor, Division of Bone and Mineral Research, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, francesca [email protected] and Roland Baron, Ph., DSS, Professor, Harvard Medical School and Harvard School of Dental Medicine, roland [email protected] Please email your resumes and contact information to Dr.

Medicine (Endocrinology), BWH 221 Longwood Ave, Boston Tel: +1 617 525 6566|Fax: +1 617 582 6193|Email: [email protected] Lab website: Our lab focuses on the identification of new central factors and the characterization of their mechanism of action in the control of reproduction and metabolism.In particular, we are interested in the hypothalamic Kiss1 and GnRH neurons using a number of genetic mouse model and viral delivery approaches.The student involved in this project will be in charge of the study of one of our potential gene candidates to play this regulatory role.

He or she will be involved in the development and maintenance of mouse colonies, performing anatomical and expression studies of gene and protein expression in the brain (PCR, in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, etc) combined with stereotaxic injections of viral constructs to modify the expression of targeted genes.Characterization of a number of biological parameters that define reproductive and metabolic functions will be required (e.fertility assessments, monitoring of puberty onset, body weight, food intake, etc).The student will be expected to work in collaboration with other members of the lab but in an independent manner.

He/she will be encouraged to present their data at local and regional meetings, analyze their data and prepare them for publication.Learning outcome: The student that joins our lab is expected to acquire knowledge of neuroanatomy and physiology of the neuronal networks that govern the endocrine system.They will gain experience in the handling of mice and maintenance of animal colonies as well as in the performing of experimental protocols, including collection of samples, analyses of these samples and interpretation and presentation of the data.

Number of hours: Negotiable Mentoring: The student will be mentored by myself and senior postdocs in the lab.Funding: No stipend is provided so the student is encouraged to apply for fellowships.To apply, email your resume to [email protected] research opportunity,Priolo Laboratory, Department of Medicine/Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital The Priolo Laboratory within the Department of Medicine/Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, is currently recruiting motivated undergraduate students to participate in translational research activities in the field of oncology.Priolo’s research program focuses on the identification of novel therapeutic targets and metabolic imaging biomarkers in mTOR-driven proliferative diseases, including genitourinary and lung cancer, Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC), and pulmonary Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM).The undegraduate should have an interest in Medical Science, Molecular Biology, and/or Biochemistry.We seek creative and passionate team players, who will contribute to a fun and highly interactive work environment.Training and mentorship will be provided by Dr.The candidate will work closely with Dr.Priolo and collaborators on research projects that include mammalian cell culture, dissection of signaling pathways, RNAi, metabolomic analyses and metabolic assays, non-coding RNA, mouse models, and positron emission tomography–based imaging.To apply, please submit your curriculum vitae to Carmen Priolo ( carmen [email protected] ), along with the name and email address of two references.Undergraduate research opportunities in the study of brain-immune interactions in neurodevelopment, Bilbo Lab, Massachusetts General Hospital/HMS PI: Staci Bilbo, PhD, Pediatrics and Neuroscience, Lurie Center for Autism, Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, Contact: [email protected] , Project: The Bilbo Lab focuses on the study of neuroimmune interactions in brain development, using pre-clinical models.

We collaborate with clinical research groups to translate our findings to human populations.

We are particularly interested in the role of immune molecules in both normal and disrupted brain development, based on evidence from human and animal studies that immune system dysfunction or inflammation may be critical in neurodevelopmental disorders, including schizophrenia, cognitive and mood disorders, and autism.We are recruiting undergraduate scholars to get involved with several aspects of our projects aimed at determining the role of neural-glial and neural-immune interactions in brain and behavioral outcomes, including cellular and molecular analyses of microglial function, behavioral analyses in rodent models, and the processing and analysis of data for collaborative clinical (human) studies at the Lurie Center for Autism.There will also be many opportunities for interacting with and shadowing clinicians at the Lurie Center, one of the largest clinical care centers for Autism and related disorders in the world.Skills Required:Wet lab skills in molecular biology (e.

qPCR, ELISA, Westerns) are preferred but not required.An understanding, respect, and acceptance of the use of live animals in research is absolutely required.Learning outcomes:Students will learn skills in rodent handling and behavior, and in cellular, molecular, cell culture, and microscopy techniques, and will have the opportunity to present at lab meetings and/or conferences, and to gain authorship on manuscripts as warranted.Hours: A commitment if ~8 hours/week for at least 2 semesters is preferred.

The lab is in the Charlestown Navy yard campus, building 114.A free shuttle from MGH main campus runs every 15 min.Mentoring: The Bilbo lab consists of many postdoctoral fellows, students, technicians, and undergraduate researchers.We are very much a team, and mentoring and teamwork are key components of our lab culture.The student will be closely mentored by an assigned postdoctoral fellow, in addition to the overall team approach, and will meet weekly with Dr.

There are weekly lab meetings on Thursdays at 3:30, for which the student is encouraged to attend (but not required).Funding: Positions are for academic credit or volunteers.

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Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP/PRISEfor funding (contact Dr.Babakhanyan for more info about funding at [email protected] ), and we are happy to help with the preparation of applications.

To apply:Please send CV and cover letter briefly explaining why you would like to get involved in research to [email protected]6 Feb 2009 - He or she will probably have to get the word out about available positions by advertising in science journals, listservs, the lab website, or through   of medicine at Harvard Medical School in Boston, first set up her own lab about 10 years ago, she asked former mentors and senior faculty at Harvard to direct  .To apply:Please send CV and cover letter briefly explaining why you would like to get involved in research to [email protected] .

Dana Farber Cancer Institute Lab location: Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Smith Building rm 834 Tuberculosis continues to be a devastating disease killing over 1 million people per year worldwide.Interestingly, most individuals can fight off infection without the need of medical intervention Undergraduate research opportunity in breast cancer, Dr. Brugge Lab, Harvard Medical School, Posted August 11, 2017 · Undergraduate research opportunity in   This technique can operate at ultra-high throughput: in excess of 10 8 reactions per day, greatly accelerating directed evolution. Whereas this miniaturization  .Interestingly, most individuals can fight off infection without the need of medical intervention.What is different about the immune response in those that can and can’t fight TB? We are attempting to answer this question by investigating activation of critical immune pathways in individual cells during early infection to determine what attributes are most beneficial to killing TB.This work will aid the development of new treatments directed at initiating an improved immune response.

Undergraduates will be paired with a postdoc in the lab to perform tissue culture, microscopy, and molecular biology experiments and will have the opportunity to develop independent projects.The student will be given full responsibility of a small project and will be encouraged to work on the project as independently as possible.This will include reading applicable literature, designing experiments, performing quantitative analysis, and presenting findings at lab meetings.Additionally, the student will provide assistance to their post-doc mentor providing exposure to additional experimental techniques.Applicants must have completed at least one biology lab course.

Students will be expected to work a minimum of 6 hours per week in the lab and preferably will commit to working in the lab first and second semester.Some research funds are available for the student’s stipend; students are still encouraged to apply to HCRP/PRISE (contact Dr.Babakhanyan [email protected] for information about fellowships) and students interested in doing research for course credit are also encouraged to apply.Interested students should submit a resume, including a list of all science courses previously taken and currently enrolled, and a short cover letter describing their interest in the project to Suzanne Gaudet (suzanne [email protected] ).Project 1 – Identifying somatic and germline variants that drive vascular tumor growth (Ref1) Project 2 – Deciphering how mutations in GNAQ (encodes G -q) cause capillary malformations in Sturge-Weber syndrome (Ref2) Project 3 -The role of endothelial cells in mitral valve adaptation after myocardial infarction (Ref3).

Skills required: Routine laboratory skills and familiarity with standard biochemical and molecular techniques (e.cell culture, western blots, PCR) would be beneficial.Learning outcome: Students will learn about diseases that are driven by mutations and/or externally driven alterations endothelial cells – the cells that line all blood vessels and the heart and heart valves through lab presentations, experimentation and data analysis and presentation.Number of hours students are expected to work: negotiable Mentoring: Students will be supervised by one of the post-doctoral fellows in the lab.

Meetings between PI and student arranged as needed Funds: Lab does not provide funding, students will need to obtain funding to cover the stipend through Harvard fellowships such as HCRP/PRISE (contact Dr.Babakhanyan for more information about fellowships at [email protected] ) or register for a research course credit.Include information about the time frame you are available (i.

115 Mill Street, Belmont, MA 02478 Tel: 617-855-3632 Our study aims use a computerized cognitive training program for patients with schizophrenia with the goal of improving certain cognitive functions (such as memory and attention) and psychosocial outcomes.This project is finishing up and data need to be analyzed.I attached a consent form of this study which project overview of the study.Skills: Student will need to have good statistical/quantitative skills to deal with longitudinal data and organization skills to organize database and perform analysis.Learning outcome: Student will be able to lean clinical research study design, data analysis method, presentation, database, neurophysiology and cognition, scientific writing.Number of hours: The number of hours is negotiable.However, this project is more applicable for someone who wants to take it as a senior thesis project.

Hall will be mentoring the student; lab postdoc may also help with mentoring the student.Funding: No funding is available to pay student’s stipend.Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships (contract Dr.Babakhanyan at [email protected] to obtain more information about Harvard undergraduate research fellowships).

To apply: Students who are interested in this project can send email to me with his/her CV and a letter.I will conduct a skype interview with the student to determine whether there is a good match.Undergraduate Position at the Laboratory of Medical Imaging and Deep Learning, Massachusetts General Hospital The Laboratory of Medical Imaging and Computation is looking for undergraduate students who are interested in research at the intersection of data science and medicine and developing programs and algorithms that improves quality and safety of patient care.It is a unique opportunity to be exposed to the cutting-edge technologies in artificial intelligence and deep learning in the context of healthcare while working with a team of passion-driven researchers from diverse backgrounds.PI name Synho Do, PhD Department Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital Contact information: Sehyo Yune, MD, MPH, MBA, Research Translation Manager: @ 25 New Chardon St.

4 th Floor, Boston, MA, 02114 Tel) 617-643-0264 Duties The student research assistant will actively play an important role to build essential components of the ongoing projects; 1) digitalized big and high quality raw data repositories, 2) fast pre-processing and robust data retrieval system from secure storage, 3) create intelligent algorithm to find an association map with self-learning capability, and 4) actionable information extraction and visualization of information.Skills required No prior research experience is required.Computer programming skills using Python and/or experience with Tensorflow is preferred.Strong accountability and ability to work in a dynamic team environment is desired.Learning outcome 1) Technical skills; utilizing deep learning in analyzing medical images to create algorithms that will benefit in patient care, various data analysis methods, study design skills.

2) General skills; scientific writing, teamwork, communication, etc.Number of hours and duration of the position Negotiable.Mentoring: The student will receive direct supervision and mentoring from the PI and will work closely with other members of the team.Funds: Students are encouraged to seek funding sources such as HCRP (contact Dr.Babakhanyan for questions regarding funding at [email protected] ).

We may consider funding for students with demonstrated strong technical skills and significant experience.Sample Projects: Brain Hemorrhage Diagnosis Intracranial hemorrhage is the most important and emergency condition to be detected from brain CT scan.As timely diagnosis is a critical prognostic factor, even a small bleeding needs immediate attention.Our deep-learning based system automatically detects and classifies intracranial hemorrhage, enabling prioritization of radiologist reading and preventing delay in diagnosis and treatment.Mammographic Cancer Detection Despite being the gold standard for breast cancer screening, mammography has shown unsatisfactory sensitivity of 85-90% for breast cancer detection, and there has been long efforts to increase its performance using computer-aided diagnosis (CAD).

2 Our team is working on a deep-learning-based CAD system to consistently classify breast density and detect breast cancer more effectively.Chest X-ray Screening We are developing a chest x-ray screening system that can detect conditions common in the underserved areas, such as pulmonary tuberculosis and pneumonia.This deep-learning-based system will enable community health workers to better understand the test result and make timely decisions regarding treatment of patients in critical conditions.Beyond Imaging We are expanding the scope of research and exploring new areas such as care management, care coordination, financial management, operations, and equipment optimization for AI-based analyses of medical images.Please refer back to our recent publications: 1.

Cho J, Lee E, Lee H, Liu B, Li X, Tajmir S, Sahani D, Do S.Machine Learning Powered Automatic Organ Classification for Patient Specific Organ Dose Estimation.Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine.Lee H, Tajmir S, Lee J, Zissen M, Yeshiwas BA, Alkasab TK, Choy G, Do S.Fully Automated Deep Learning System for Bone Age Assessment.Lee H, Rogers J, Cho J, Daye D, Mishra V, Choy G, Tajmir S, Lev M, Do S.

Machine Intelligence for Accurate X-ray Screening and Read-out Prioritization: PICC Line Detection Study.Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine.Learn more by visiting our website at If interested, please send your resume and cover letter to Dr.Sehyo Yune [email protected] September 5, 2017 Undergraduate research/thesis opportunity using MRI and brain stimulation, Dr.

Halko, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center PI name: Mark Halko, PhD, [email protected] .Instructor of Neurology, Berenson-Allen Center for Noninvasive Brain Stimulation, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center./ Location: The Berenson-Allen Center is located in Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.Research study visits take place at the Harvard University Center for Brain Science Neuroimaging Facility (Northwest Building) in Cambridge, MA.Description of the project: Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is an emerging technology for the treatment of neurological and psychiatric illnesses.

Recent interest has shifted to the cerebellum, where initial promising therapeutic investigations have been made in diseases such as schizophrenia and ataxia.Despite these developments, the understanding of which parameters are best suited to stimulate the cerebellum remains a mystery.This project involves magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and three different stimulation intensities to understand the relevant dose parameters of repetitive cerebellar stimulation.We apply repetitive TMS to the cerebellum to impact networks associated with attention, and observe the neuropsychological impact upon attention, relating parameters of stimulation to brain activity acquired from MRI and psychological behavior.Simultaneous acquisition of attentional metrics will investigate of the dose-response relationship between stimulation and networks and stimulation and cognition, allowing for optimization of cerebellar stimulation protocols for effective therapeutic intervention.

Students will assist in performing MRI scans and TMS.Depending on computer proficiency and analysis skills, there is also the opportunity to participate in data analysis.Skills required: No prior research experience is required as training will be provided.Background in psychology or neuroscience; and basic knowledge of UNIX, programming, and statistics preferred.Learning outcome: This position offers extensive research experience and opportunity for a thesis project.

Students will become trained in operating the MRI machine; and gain familiarity in human subjects and neuroimaging research, and noninvasive brain stimulation.Number of hours and length of stay are negotiable, but 5+ hours a week expected.Mentoring: Mentoring will be provided by regular meetings with Mark Halko and the neurologist on the study team.The student also has the opportunity to join meetings and research talks (rounds) at the Berenson-Allen Center/BIDMC and Longwood Medical Area.Students are encouraged to apply for HCRP and other Harvard Research Fellowships or obtain a research or thesis course credit (email Dr.Anna Babakhanyan at [email protected] for more information about Harvard undergraduate fellowships for research).To apply: Please email your resume and a short cover letter to Mark Halko, [email protected] .Undergraduate student intern position, Greka Lab, BWH/Harvard Medical School and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard Our laboratory has a strong interest in the biology of ion channels and calcium signaling, with the goal to harness our foundational work in this space for the development of novel precision medicine therapeutics.We are currently focused on rare, genetically defined kidney diseases, for which there is tremendous unmet need.

We ultimately hope to use the transformative potential of this work to also address areas of unmet need in highly prevalent, hard-to-treat diseases affecting millions of people worldwide, including the modern epidemic of diabetic kidney disease.Recent efforts in our lab were focused on Transient Receptor Potential channels (TRP) as regulators of actin dynamics and cell motility.Our work uncovered TRPC5 and TRPC6 as calcium influx pathways regulating the activity of the RhoGTPases Rac1 and RhoA.We were also recently successful in translating our insights from TRPC5 biology into a targeted approach for kidney disease therapeutics.Our work revealed the calcium-permeable TRPC5 channel as a key mediator of proteinuric kidney disease.

We also showed that genetic deletion or inhibition of TRPC5 protects the kidney filter.Significant effort in the laboratory is also directed toward understanding the mechanisms linking calcium signaling to disrupted cellular metabolism, with important connections to the modern epidemic of obesity and diabetes.Harnessing the highly interdisciplinary nature of our team at Harvard Institutes of Medicine and the Broad Institute, students, postdoctoral fellows and staff scientists on our team bring their unique expertise in ion channel biophysics, pharmacology, cell biology, genomics, biochemistry, imaging, in vivo studies and computational biology to solve complex scientific problems.No prior lab experience is required, but a strong motivation to be a team player, and to assist in hands-on experiments under direct supervision from graduate students or post-docs are a must! Funding from HCRP is desirable (email Dr.Anna Babakhanyan at [email protected] for more information about Harvard undergraduate fellowships for research).

For more information, please visit our website:The Division of Women’s Health Training Programs are designed to create and develop the next generation of leaders in medicine, policy and clinical and academic research fields.Our research trainees receive a wide variety of skills and experiences.They collect valuable knowledge as they assist in an ongoing research project, participate in division events, attend one-on-one meetings with a supervisor/mentor, and complete projects and publications by the end of their training program.They should come away with not only a comprehensive knowledge of the project they have assisted with but also with a skill set which can be applied to future research.The focus of your training will be global women’s health research, specifically focused issues around human trafficking, from the local to the international level.

As a non-lab trainee, your work will focus on research and writing.We expect that at the end of your experience with us you will have gained knowledge about not only our specifics research topic, but also global women’s health research as a whole, and how to present those finding to a wide audience.Most importantly, you should complete your training having gained the following skills and abilities: Ability to analyze large amounts of information to find what is important/relevant, and quickly; Ability to comprehend and interpret both empirical and analytical data; Learned how to conduct literature reviews/searches; Ability to evaluate topics and design research studies; Ability to build off of what you are learning, to create new questions and ideas; Demonstrating an ease with engaging other professionals; Ability to communicate easily and skillfully with the survivor community; & Effectively communicate with the team members and supervisors.By the completion of your experience, you should complete your assigned projects on your particular research topic which you will present to your supervisor; you will also have a final meeting with your supervisor to discuss what you have learned and what you will take away from the experience.

Stoklosa will be mentor, mentor meetings every other week Funding: We do not provide funding.Students are encouraged to volunteer, register for research course credit or apply to the HCRP or other Harvard fellowships (contact Dr.Anna Babakhanyan [email protected] for more information) To Apply: Please email your resume and writing sample to Dr.Xin Wang, Director, Neuroapoptosis Drug Discovery Laboratory Department of Neurosurgery, Brigham and Women’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School 60 Fenwood Ave.

Longwood, MA My lab focuses on the identification of candidate therapeutics and potential targets as well as biomarkers for neurological disorders including Stroke, newborn hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and other neurodegenerative diseases.Another main interest concerns the molecular and cellular apoptotic mechanism of neurodegenerative diseases, because a greater understanding will help in the development of new therapies that act on disease genes.Link to published manuscripts describing the work: Skills required: Prior research experience preferred but not required.Learning outcome: students will acquire lab skills, study design, data analysis method, presentations, scientific writing, possibility to co-author original scientific paper and review article Number of hours: negotiable Dr.Robert Luo Funding: No funds but students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit (contact Dr.Anna Babakhanyan [email protected] for more information) To Apply: Please email your resume to Dr.Xin Wang at [email protected] Research Opportunity, Hoffman Lab Hoffman lab is looking for a student to participate in the synthesis of novel quantum materials for atomically-resolved imaging experiments.We use molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) to assemble new materials one atomic layer at a time, so we can create combined "heterostructures" with exotic electronic properties not found in nature.

We are seeking a student who can help us with several tasks: (1) automation of MBE processes such as temperature control, shutter manipulation (skills to be developed: learn the basic principles of MBE, learn LabVIEW & other instrument communication protocols) (2) design and build a "vacuum suitcase" for transferring samples cleanly from one experiment to another (skills to be developed: computer-aided design (CAD), vacuum and pumping technology) Successful completion of these tasks would naturally lead to direct involvement in our more fundamental scientific endeavors, such as growth and scanning tunneling microscope (STM) imaging of LaVO3/SrVO3 heterostructures, which we speculate may be strongly correlated topological insulators.* minimum 10 hr/week commitment for one semester * longer-term commitment desired * day to day mentoring by Jason Hoffman * weekly group meeting w/ Jenny Hoffman * eligible for course credit (Physics 90r) or $11/hr funding from HCRP (deadline Wed, Sept 13 2017.Anna Babakhanyan [email protected] for more information) * please email CV (including coursework & any relevant experience), along with brief motivation for pursuing the work to Prof.Jason Hoffman PI: Dr.Lab is at 149 13th street, Charlestown, MA.Project overview: The student would be working with a team of doctors, engineers, and scientists from MGH, MIT, HMS, and NASA to develop a portable computed tomography (CT) imaging system for use in rural communities, battlefields, and extended space missions.The student would focus on the electrical and mechanical design challenges.

Some of the relevant IP from our group can be found here, here, here, and here.Required skills: some background in engineering or physics is required.Candidate should also have some familiarity with electronic circuits, soldering, and MATLAB.Image processing, machining, and computer-aided design (CAD) skills are desirable, but not required.Learning outcome: Working in our group, the student would become familiar with medical x-ray systems, circuit design, and other areas of engineering and medical research.

The student would have the opportunity to shadow Dr.Gupta in the Radiology department at MGH.Hours are flexible, but we want at least 10 hours per week.Preference will be given to student who are interested in working with our group for 2 or more semesters, possibly towards the completion of a thesis or academic paper.Mentoring: the student would work closely with Avilash Cramer, a Harvard-MIT medical engineering PhD student in our group.

Funding: we can provide funding for a student stipend.Interested students should send a resume to [email protected] , and arrange an interview.Students should also provide names and details of 1-3 references.Undergraduate/Graduate Research Opportunity, Department of Ophthalmology (Department of Microbiology and Immunobiology), Harvard Medical School PI: Michael S.; Sir William Osler Professor, Department of Ophthalmology (Department of Microbiology and Immunobiology), Harvard Medical School.Eye and Ear Infirmary (MGH Campus), immediately adjacent to Charles/MGH red line Project Description: Prof.Gilmore is PI of the NIH/NIAID supported Harvard-wide Program on Antibiotic Resistance.

The goal of that program is to understand underlying mechanisms of antibiotic resistance, and to derive new approaches for preventing and treating multidrug resistant infection.Under this umbrella there are several projects currently being pursued.Some utilize genomic technologies for identifying key properties of multidrug resistant microbes, such as the enterococci and staphylococci, that allow them to persist in the hospital environment, be transmitted to patients, infect, cause disease, and resistant antibiotic treatment.These incorporate elements of bacterial genomics, pathogenesis, human ecology, bacterial metabolism and cell structure, origins, evolution and other fields.

A current area of substantial interest is understanding the nature, origins and flow of antibiotic resistance among members of the genus Enterococcus.

This work recently found that intrinsic resistance to many antimicrobials and disinfectants appears to have paralleled the emergence of life from the sea (Tracing the Enterococci from Paleozoic Origins to the Hospital.Lebreton F, Manson AL, Saavedra JT, Straub TJ, Earl AM, Gilmore MS.Follow on studies involve collaborating with extreme adventurers and others to obtain samples suspected of harboring enterococci from remote and unsampled environments, unperturbed by human activity.So far this has resulted in the identification of at least 20 new species, which we examine for genes related to the resistances and other traits we now find in strains of enterococci from hospital infection.Other studies use genetic approaches, such as Tn-seq and conventional mutagenesis, to identify properties of enterococci and staphylococci that limit the effectiveness of antibiotics, with a view toward deriving new drugs that circumvent those obstacles.Skills required: Students should be familiar with basic laboratory methods, including preparing and dispensing solutions in large and small quantities, basic chemistry and biology, and keeping an accurate research notebook.Students will work under the daily supervision of postdoctoral research associates, and will meet with the PI weekly to discuss results and identify new directions.

Learning Outcome: Students acquire skills and knowledge for safely culturing and manipulating antibiotic resistant bacteria, a detailed understanding of the antibiotic resistance problem, an understanding of bacterial genomics and evolution, and basic skills needed to conduct research in molecular biology and genomics, such as data acquisition, bioinformatic analysis, scientific writing and data presentation.This varies according to each student’s availability and goals, but requires a plan that has clear potential to make a meaningful impact on the research project, and to generate an experience or product of value to the student.Funding: Students are encouraged to seek fellowship support through HCRP and other resources(contact Dr.Anna Babakhanyan [email protected] for more information).

Gilmore (michael [email protected] ) with a brief outline of your interests, goals, and anticipated time availability.PI: Carmelo Nucera, MD, PhD Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School Principal Investigator Human Thyroid Cancers Preclinical and Translational Research Program, Specialist in Endocrine Diseases and Metabolism Division of Experimental Pathology, Department of Pathology Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Simon C.Fireman Research Center, Harvard Medical School 99 Brookline Avenue, Office Room: RN-0270A, Boston (MA) 02215, USA Email 1: [email protected]: 617-667-5964 Lab-Phone: 617-667-1696 My laboratory is open to accept undergraduate students for cancer research. I'm genuinely dedicated to mentor undergraduate students and advancing translational Thyroid Cancer Research and non-coding RNA-based discoveries.

 I'm actively committed to mentor and apply my research to patient care, to facilitate innovation for healthcare, solve unmet clinical needs, and ultimately improve public health.I am an MD/PhD with specialty in endocrine cancers and I’m developing as Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School a multidisciplinary research program in the "Division of Cancer Biology and Angiogenesis/Experimental Pathology" at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical School, focused on "preclinical and translational models of human thyroid cancer with an emphasis on mechanisms of metastatic networks, new models of in vitro angiogenesis, tumor microenvironment, and metabolic regulations, using novel targeted therapies anti-BRAFV600E anti-tumor microenvironment.I am primarily engaged in basic and translational thyroid cancer research, but also actively participate in tutoring and teaching activities to basic science students and medical students.I have 15 years of research and clinical experience.In particular, my research interests are in elucidating mechanisms by which the oncogene BRAFV600E leads to the invasive and metastatic phenotype in aggressive and iodine-refractory thyroid cancers.

 I'm highly committed and motivated to applying my research and effort to patient care, to facilitate innovation, to solve unmet clinical needs, and improve public health.I have been awarded from the American Thyroid Association, the NIH/NCI for Thyroid Cancer Research, Tumor Microenvironment, and BRAFV600E. My translational research and mentoring program is aimed: (i) To determine the prognostic role of Long intergenic non-coding RNA (LincRNA) in thyroid cancer.(ii) To identify new prognostic biomarkers and validate therapeutics for treating metastatic/refractory thyroid cancers.(iii) To identify pro-metastatic/-angiogenic and metabolic pathways in the microenvironment of BRAFV600E-positive thyroid cancer.

(v) To investigate pathogenesis and molecular basis of “orphan and rare’ endocrine diseases.If you are interested in applying to this Research Program please submit your Curriculum Vitae and 2 references (i.Faculty) to: Carmelo Nucera [email protected] For questions regarding HCRP or other Harvard fellowships that support undergraduate research or registering for course credit contact Dr.

Anna Babakhanyan [email protected] for more information.Cancer Immunology and Virology Department, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute The goal of this program is to create a cohesive immunology training program in which undergraduate students are prepared for entry into PhD programs in biomedical research by working closely with graduate students, fellows, and principal investigators within the Harvard community.The current program for graduate students and fellows was formalized in July of 2016 with the support of the NCI and we have since appointed 7 trainees to the program.There are 26 mentors/principal investigators that make up the program and much of the academic cancer immunology community in Boston and Cambridge.Students will have the opportunity to work closely with these trainees and mentors within this program to help give them experience in the lab by learning techniques, reading papers, and working closely with brilliant scientists.

Description of the project and duties:The goal of our lab is to dissect mechanisms used by tissue-resident stem cells and co-opted by rare cells within tumors with stemness properties and metastasis initiating potential to evade immune surveillance.To this end, we take advantage of a mouse model we recently developed that allows the study of T cell interactions and killing of any cell type, called the JEDI mouse.The selected student will have the opportunity to be an active member of a lab at the intersection of immunology, stem cell biology and technology development.Requirements: No prior research experience is necessary.

However, an interest in cancer, immunology and/or stem cell biology is required.Mentoring: Mentoring will be primarily provided by postdoctoral fellows in the laboratory.The student will meet with the PI regularly in weekly meetings with the fellow.Learning outcome: laboratory skills, research skills: study design, data analysis method, presentations, scientific writing, etc.

Number of hours: 10 hours per week minimum.

The duration of the project will be one year but it can be flexible and negotiable.Compensation: This is primarily a volunteer position; however, students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit (contact Dr.Anna Babakhanyan [email protected] for more information) .Applying: Interested students should email Dr.Agudo a single PDF document with the below requirements (email: judith [email protected] ): 1.

Cover Letter- Introduce yourself and describe your interests in biology and basic research.Resume- Please include relevant coursework, GPA, prior lab experience (if any), and other extra-curricular activities.Contact Information:1 Jimmy Fund Way, Smith Building room 770A Boston, Massachusetts 02115 Skills preferred (not required): Synthesis of small chemical constructs and their conjugation to nanoparticles: involving HPLC, TLC, SEC, column chromatography, NMR, LCMS, buffer making, etc.(Mandatory) Radiochemistry: individuals are allowed to practice radiolabeling with radioisotopes (conditional/optional) In vitro cell based specificity study: cell culture (tumor cell lines, T cells, B cells), media reconstitution, autocleave, etc.

(conditional/optional) In vivo small animal active targeting study: xenograft cell implantation on mice, animal care (conditional/optional).Animal imaging: tail vein injection and PET imaging with microPET-CT (conditional/optional).Research skills: Notebook recording, study design, data analysis, presentations, scientific writing, etc.Number of working hours (negotiable): >16 hrs Length of the project: minimum 3 month Mentoring: PI will mentor student day to day.

Stipend: Laboratory will not provide any funds to pay student’s stipend.Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit (contact Dr.Anna Babakhanyan [email protected] for more information).Yuan at [email protected] research opportunity in large-scale brain networks and neurodegenerative disorders,Dr.Sepulcre Lab, Department of Radiology, Mass General Hospital PI name: Jorge Sepulcre The Sepulcre lab focuses on brain imaging studies aiming at the understanding of large-scale brain networks implicated in human cognition and neurodegenerative disorders.We also devote a substantial part of our work developing cutting-edge network methodologies for different brain imaging modalities such as functional connectivity MRI and PET imaging.We currently have several line in which students can enroll depending on their interest, including working with functional connectivity MRI in blind children, PET tracers and MRI in Alzheimer disease, fMRI of language networks and the developing of graph theory analyses to get a better understanding of the relationships of the brain networks.Skills required: No any laboratory skills are required, the student will learn all the skills needed in the lab, also no prior research experience is needed, just enthusiasm.

Learning outcome: Depending on the project the student wish to enroll he will learn how to design a study, write a proposal, process data and any laboratory skill that would be needed for the work.Number of hours: As much as he/she is willing to be involved.Length of the project: is variable, but if data is already collected it takes 3 months for the analysis and 3 more for further elaborations.Mentoring: the PI and any of the members of the lab will be helping the student to accomplish his/her needs.Lab meetings are help every other Friday, but the PI's door is always open for any questions or concerns.

Students are welcome to apply for HCRP and other fellowships or register for course credit (contact Dr.Anna Babakhanyan [email protected] for more information).TO APPLY: Email your resume to the PI and a small statement on why you would like to join the lab, as well as your expectations to Dr.Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Department of Neonatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Division of Newborn Medicine, Boston Children’s Hospital PI: Jonathan Litt, MD MPH ScD Department of Neonatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Division of Newborn Medicine, Boston Children’s Hospital 330 Brookline Avenue, Rose 3, Boston MA 02215 Project: Preterm infants are at risk for ongoing problems with health and development.Even preterm infants without significant morbidities have health needs beyond those of a health term-born child requiring specialized follow-up by multiple providers – primary care pediatricians, high-risk infant follow-up programs, early intervention providers, and audiologists, to name but a few.Care coordination is an integral part of the family-centered medical home and has been shown to improve outcomes for patients and families.Data from a recent pilot study of preterm infants revealed high levels of unmet needs for care coordination services.The majority of children in this small local cohort did not receive care within the context of a family-centered medical home.

Noting this, we aim to develop a program within the Infant Follow-up Program (IFUP) at Boston Children’s Hospital to help the families of preterm infants integrate their care among providers after hospital discharge.Specifically, we have four distinct objectives: Characterize parents’ needs for care coordination, provider communication, and systems navigation.Explore IFUP capacity for providing care coordination services.Identify partners among community-based pediatricians, hospital-based subspecialists, and other service providers.Develop processes and tools for sharing care responsibilities among providers and across systems with an emphasis on promoting bi-directional communication and accountability.

For this project, the student would help develop and administer parent survey instruments for met and unmet care needs.The student would also help design and test interventions to improve current practice.The student would work closely with our outpatient follow-up program.Skills required: No prior research experience is required.

Learning outcome: Research skills such as study design, instrument development, and data analysis methods.

Number of hours: The project is just now in the starting stages.The hours and length of time the student invests are negotiable and based on availability and interest.Please note: the Infant Follow-up Program is a full-day clinic that is held weekly on Mondays.The student is expected to be available for part of the day (either morning or afternoon).The student is also invited to attend didactic conferences held by the Division of Neonatology held at various times during the week, though these are not required.

Litt will serve as the primary mentor with Dr.Jane Stewart, Director of Infant Follow-up at Boston Children’s Hospital, as a co-mentor.Meetings will be held weekly to discuss the project and progress toward mutually set goals.Funding: This project does not provide any funds to pay student’s stipend.

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Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit (contact Dr.Anna Babakhanyan [email protected] for more information).To apply: Interested students should submit a resume and brief, 1 paragraph statement describing their interest in learning about research, generally speaking, and Newborn Medicine/Perinatal Epidemiology https://php-myadmin.com/report/where-to-purchase-astronomy-report-academic-harvard-writing 2017-12-14 daily 0.9   2017-12-14 daily 0.9 https://php-myadmin.com/coursework/best-websites-to-get-a-college-math-coursework-bluebook-graduate-4-days-privacy 2017-12-14 daily 0.9  .To apply: Interested students should submit a resume and brief, 1 paragraph statement describing their interest in learning about research, generally speaking, and Newborn Medicine/Perinatal Epidemiology.

Please note that interest in, and prior exposure to, the specific content area is not required.Litt at [email protected] research opportunities in “evo-devo” of bats, Tabin Lab, Harvard Medical School Jasmin Camacho, NSF predoctoral fellow, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology and Department of Genetics (HMS) Project: The Tabin Lab studies the genetic basis by which form and structure are regulated, both during embryonic development to produce the exquisite morphology of the vertebrate embryo and over evolutionary time to generate the extraordinary and beautiful diversity of animal forms on this planet https://xlphp.org/paper.php 2017-12-15 daily 0.9 https://xlphp.org/research-paper.php 2017-12-15 daily 0.9 https://xlphp.org/powerpoint-presentation/obesity.php 2017-12-15 daily 0.9 https://xlphp.org/laboratory-report/help-me-write-my-astronomy-laboratory-report-british-double-spaced-college-sophomore 2017-12-15  .Litt at [email protected] research opportunities in “evo-devo” of bats, Tabin Lab, Harvard Medical School Jasmin Camacho, NSF predoctoral fellow, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology and Department of Genetics (HMS) Project: The Tabin Lab studies the genetic basis by which form and structure are regulated, both during embryonic development to produce the exquisite morphology of the vertebrate embryo and over evolutionary time to generate the extraordinary and beautiful diversity of animal forms on this planet.In our developmental studies we combine classical methods of experimental embryology with modern molecular, imaging, genetic and genomic techniques for interrogating and testing gene function https://xlphp.org/paper.php 2017-12-15 daily 0.9 https://xlphp.org/research-paper.php 2017-12-15 daily 0.9 https://xlphp.org/powerpoint-presentation/obesity.php 2017-12-15 daily 0.9 https://xlphp.org/laboratory-report/help-me-write-my-astronomy-laboratory-report-british-double-spaced-college-sophomore 2017-12-15  .In our developmental studies we combine classical methods of experimental embryology with modern molecular, imaging, genetic and genomic techniques for interrogating and testing gene function.In our evolutionary work we have addressed question of morphological, behavioral and metabolic evolution in a variety of species using both developmental and genetic approaches.We are recruiting undergraduate scholars to get involved with several aspects of our projects aimed at determining the genetics of skeletogenesis in the regulation of bone growth and bone shape differences using the bat limb and cranial base.Other projects include the role of stem cells in facial evolution in a diverse group of bats and the development and evolution of novel animal features.

A more bioinformatics approach may be available based on research interests (genome and transcriptome dataset).Additional projects and ideas may be discussed in terms of a senior thesis, if bats are used as a model.Skills Required: Wet lab skills in molecular biology (e.qPCR, cloning) are preferred but not required.

An understanding, respect, and acceptance of the use of live animals in research is absolutely required.Learning outcomes: Students will learn skills in cellular, molecular, cell culture, and microscopy techniques, and will have the opportunity to present at lab meetings and/or conferences, and to gain authorship on manuscripts as warranted.If interested, the student will have the opportunity to conduct field studies in any of the following countries of interest: Mexico, Panama, Trinidad.Hours: A commitment of ~8-10 hours/week for at least 2 semesters is preferred.The lab is in the Harvard Medical School campus, New Research Building.

A free shuttle from Lamont Library to NRB runs every 10 min 7-10 AM and 4-6PM and every 30 minutes 10-4pm.Mentoring: The Tabin lab consists of many postdoctoral fellows, students, technicians, and undergraduate researchers.The student will be closely mentored by a predoctoral fellow.There are weekly lab meetings on Mondays at 12:15 and tri-lab meetings on Tuesdays at 10:00 for which the student is encouraged to attend (but not required).Funding: Positions are for academic credit or volunteers.

Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP for funding, and we are happy to help with the preparation of applications.For more information about Harvard undergraduate research fellowships contact Dr.To apply: Please send CV and cover letter briefly explaining why you would like to get involved in research to [email protected] August 23, 2017 Undergraduate research opportunities in the study of brain-immune interactions in neurodevelopment, Bilbo Lab, Massachusetts General Hospital/HMS Staci Bilbo, PhD, Pediatrics and Neuroscience, Lurie Center for Autism, Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, Contact: [email protected] , Project: The Bilbo Lab focuses on the study of neuroimmune interactions in brain development, using pre-clinical models.We collaborate with clinical research groups to translate our findings to human populations.

We are particularly interested in the role of immune molecules in both normal and disrupted brain development, based on evidence from human and animal studies that immune system dysfunction or inflammation may be critical in neurodevelopmental disorders, including schizophrenia, cognitive and mood disorders, and autism.We are recruiting undergraduate scholars to get involved with several aspects of our projects aimed at determining the role of neural-glial and neural-immune interactions in brain and behavioral outcomes, including cellular and molecular analyses of microglial function, behavioral analyses in rodent models, and the processing and analysis of data for collaborative clinical (human) studies at the Lurie Center for Autism.There will also be many opportunities for interacting with and shadowing clinicians at the Lurie Center, one of the largest clinical care centers for Autism and related disorders in the world.Skills Required:Wet lab skills in molecular biology (e.

qPCR, ELISA, Westerns) are preferred but not required.An understanding, respect, and acceptance of the use of live animals in research is absolutely required.Learning outcomes:Students will learn skills in rodent handling and behavior, and in cellular, molecular, cell culture, and microscopy techniques, and will have the opportunity to present at lab meetings and/or conferences, and to gain authorship on manuscripts as warranted.

Hours: A commitment if ~8 hours/week for at least 2 semesters is preferred.

The lab is in the Charlestown Navy yard campus, building 114.A free shuttle from MGH main campus runs every 15 min.Mentoring: The Bilbo lab consists of many postdoctoral fellows, students, technicians, and undergraduate researchers.We are very much a team, and mentoring and teamwork are key components of our lab culture.The student will be closely mentored by an assigned postdoctoral fellow, in addition to the overall team approach, and will meet weekly with Dr.

There are weekly lab meetings on Thursdays at 3:30, for which the student is encouraged to attend (but not required).Funding: Positions are for academic credit or volunteers.Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP for funding, and we are happy to help with the preparation of applications (contact Dr.Anna Babakhanyan [email protected] for more information about various undergraduate fellowships).

To apply:Please send CV and cover letter briefly explaining why you would like to get involved in research to [email protected] .Posted August 15, 2017 Undergraduate Research Training in Immunology, Dr.Judith Agudo, Department of Cancer Immunology and Virology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Program Background:The goal of this program is to create a cohesive immunology training program in which undergraduate students are prepared for entry into PhD programs in biomedical research by working closely with graduate students, fellows, and principal investigators within the Harvard community.The current program for graduate students and fellows was formalized in July of 2016 with the support of the NCI and we have since appointed 7 trainees to the program.There are 26 mentors/principal investigators that make up the program and much of the academic cancer immunology community in Boston and Cambridge.

Students will have the opportunity to work closely with these trainees and mentors within this program to help give them experience in the lab by learning techniques, reading papers, and working closely with brilliant scientists.Description of the project and duties:The goal of our lab is to dissect mechanisms used by tissue-resident stem cells and co-opted by rare cells within tumors with stemness properties and metastasis initiating potential to evade immune surveillance.To this end, we take advantage of a mouse model we recently developed that allows the study of T cell interactions and killing of any cell type, called the JEDI mouse.The selected student will have the opportunity to be an active member of a lab at the intersection of immunology, stem cell biology and technology development.

Requirements:No prior research experience is necessary.However, an interest in cancer, immunology and/or stem cell biology is required.Mentoring: Mentoring will be primarily provided by postdoctoral fellows in the laboratory.The student will meet with the PI regularly in weekly meetings with the fellow.Learning outcome: laboratory skills, research skills: study design, data analysis method, presentations, scientific writing, etc.

Number of hours: 10 hours per week minimum.The duration of the project will be one year but it can be flexible and negotiable.Compensation: This is primarily a volunteer position; however, students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit (contact Dr.Anna Babakhanyan [email protected] for more information) .Applying:Interested students should email Dr.

Agudo a single PDF document with the below requirements (email: judith [email protected] ): 1.Cover Letter - Introduce yourself and describe your interests in biology and basic research. Resume - Please include relevant coursework, GPA, prior lab experience (if any), and other extra-curricular activities.Contact Information: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Cancer Immunology Training Program 1 Jimmy Fund Way, Smith Building room 770A, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, MGH Laura Lewis, Ph.

, Harvard Society of Fellows and Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital.Contact at: [email protected] Project: How do sleep and sleep deprivation affect the brain? We are using newly developed techniques for EEG and fMRI to study human brain activity during sleep and understand the effects of sleep deprivation.The goal is to understand the brain circuits that regulate sleep, how brain activity changes during drowsiness and states of unconsciousness, and how sleep dysfunction contributes to neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease.The student's role could involve: hands-on experimental work, including applying EEG caps and acquiring MRI images; interacting with patient populations, administering questionnaires, etc.

; manual coding of data; and programming in MATLAB for data analysis.Skills required: This position could focus on experimental or computational neuroscience depending on the individual student’s background.Students should be comfortable working with human subjects, and available for occasional nighttime work, as some sleep experiments occur at night.Experience with Matlab, programming, and/or signal processing would be an asset for students seeking a computational neuroscience position.Learning outcome: Students will gain training in hands-on clinical research and/or computational neuroscience, depending on the project.

Hours: A commitment of ~8-10 hours/week for at least 2 semesters is preferred.This project is located at the Athinoula A.Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at MGH (free shuttle runs from MGH main campus).Mentoring: Regular meetings will be scheduled with Dr.

Funding: This position is for academic credit or volunteers.Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships for funding and we are happy to help with applications (contact Dr.Anna Babakhanyan [email protected] for more information).To apply: Please send CV and cover letter to [email protected]: Jorge Plutzky, MD, Director, Preventive Cardiology, Cardiovascular Medicine We have an excellent available opening for a bright, talented, hardworking person to work in the laboratory either as an undergraduate researcher who is interested in subsequent medical or graduate school. Plutzky laboratory does cutting edge research regarding transcriptional mechanisms underlying complex phenotypes that intersect obesity, diabetes and vascular disease.

The science is exciting, broad (from cells to mice to human samples), clinically relevant, with strong collaborators, typically appears in the highest level journals, involves a very collegial group and a proven record of mentorship, all at an excellent location in the Harvard Medical School Quadrangle and associated hospitals, and based in a modern, state of the art facility.We are especially proud of how well our prior undergraduates have done in their subsequent careers and the chance the group had to help advance their futures.To apply:email [email protected] or 857-307-1989 for any questions or to discuss the position further.Undergraduate research/thesis opportunity using MRI and brain stimulation PI name: Mark Halko, PhD, [email protected] .Instructor of Neurology, Berenson-Allen Center for Noninvasive Brain Stimulation, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

/ Location: The Berenson-Allen Center is located in Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.Research study visits take place at the Harvard University Center for Brain Science Neuroimaging Facility in Cambridge, MA.Description of the project: Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is an emerging technology for the treatment of neurological and psychiatric illnesses.Recent interest has shifted to the cerebellum, where initial promising therapeutic investigations have been made in diseases such as schizophrenia and ataxia.Despite these developments, the understanding of which parameters are best suited to stimulate the cerebellum remains a mystery.

This project involves magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and three different stimulation intensities to understand the relevant dose parameters of repetitive cerebellar stimulation.We apply repetitive TMS to the cerebellum to impact networks associated with attention, and observe the neuropsychological impact upon attention, relating parameters of stimulation to brain activity acquired from MRI and psychological behavior.Simultaneous acquisition of attentional metrics will investigate of the dose-response relationship between stimulation and networks and stimulation and cognition, allowing for optimization of cerebellar stimulation protocols for effective therapeutic intervention.Students will assist in conducting MRI scans and TMS.Depending on computer proficiency and analysis skills, there is also the opportunity to participate in data analysis.

Skills required: Background in psychology or neuroscience preferred.No prior research experience is required as training will be provided.Basic knowledge of UNIX, programming, and statistics preferred.Learning outcome: This position offers extensive research experience and opportunity for a thesis project.Students will become trained in operating the MRI machine; and gain familiarity in human subjects and neuroimaging research, and noninvasive brain stimulation.

Number of hours and length of stay are negotiable, but 5+ hours a week expected.Mentoring: Mentoring will be provided by regular meetings with Mark Halko and the neurologist on the study team.The student also has the opportunity to join meetings and research talks (rounds) at the Berenson-Allen Center/BIDMC and Longwood Medical Area.Compensation: This is a volunteer position.Students are encouraged to apply for HCRP and other Harvard Research Fellowships or obtain a research or thesis course credit.

To apply: Please email your resume and a short cover letter to Mark Halko, [email protected] .Undergraduate research opportunity Dr.Ursula Kaiser Laboratory, Brigham and Women's Hospital An increasing body of evidence has demonstrated that several G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)–ligand pairs are critical for normal human reproductive development and function.Patients harboring genetic insults in either the receptors or their cognate ligands have presented with reproductive disorders characterized by varying degrees of GnRH deficiency.These disorders include idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) and Kallmann Syndrome (KS).

Mutations in PROKR2 have been identified in patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism or Kallmann syndrome, characterized by GnRH deficiency.However, the molecular mechanisms through which these mutations cause disease are not fully understood.Several of these mutations are in amino acids in the 4 th or 6 th transmembrane domain of PROKR2, which are highly conserved among G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and have been shown to impair cell surface trafficking, often causing misfolding of the receptors.The mechanisms involved in post-translational processing and trafficking of GPCRs from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the cell surface are not fully understood, but it has been shown that chaperone proteins play an important role in the intracellular trafficking of GPCRs.We hypothesize that mutations in PROKR2 that interfere with cell surface expression have impaired interactions with chaperone proteins and instead may interact with proteins targeting them to degradation pathways.

The goal of our studies is to identify and compare the proteins involved in PROKR2 intracellular trafficking by performed immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of wild-type (WT) PROKR2 and trafficking defective mutants.Abreu AP, Noel SD, Xu S, Carroll RS, Latronico AC, Kaiser UB.Evidence of the importance of the first intracellular loop of prokineticin receptor 2 in receptor function.G protein-coupled receptors involved in GnRH regulation: Molecular insights from human disease.Learning outcome: Students will have the opportunity to learn basic laboratory techniques including but not limited to mammalian cell culture, western blot, immunoprecipitation, bioimaging, and molecular cloning.

In addition, they will learn how to design scientifically rigorous research experiments and perform data analysis.

Students will also be given the opportunity to present their work at our laboratory meeting and/or scientific meetings.Number of hours students are expected to work is negotiable.Yong Bhum Song, a postdoctoral fellow in Dr.Kaiser’s lab, will serve as the primary mentor.

He will meet with the student on a daily basis.Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP, PRISE or register for a course-credit with their concentration advisers.The student should submit their contact information as well as their curriculum vitae to Dr.Ursula Kaiser at [email protected]/or Yong Bhum Song at [email protected] .Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School Advisors: Slim Sassi, Ph.Location: MGH Simches Research Center, 185 Cambridge Street, Boston Project description: Single cell sequencing is a powerful method to study heterogeneous cell populations at the genomic and transcriptomic level.These approaches are becoming increasingly vital to understanding tumor biology and drug resistance, but the methodology to gain useful sequencing data from single tumor cells is still in its infancy.In this project, we’re working to develop and optimize biochemical tools to generate vast amounts of high quality single cell data to explore tumor heterogeneity within and among primary sarcomas.Skills needed: The ideal candidate has had someexposure to organic chemistry and molecular biology, including courses such as LPS A, LifeSci 1A, Chem 17/27 or Chem 10/20, or other relevant coursework.Prior laboratory experience would be an advantage.

Learning outcome: You’ll have a chance to contribute to multiple aspects of the project, including nucleic acids chemistry, DNA synthesis, sequencing, robotic automation, biomaterials, and fluidics.Mentoring: You’ll work together with a team thatincludes a Research Fellow, an Instructor, and a technician in a collaboration that spans two groups at MGH.Time commitment: Full time for the summer, or 6- 12 hours flexible per week during a semester.Funding: Direct hourly funding is available.To apply, please contact Undergraduate Research Opportunity, using fMRI and TMS to study Autism Spectrum Disorders, Harvard Center for Brain Sciences PI: Mark Eldaief, MD [email protected] Center for Brain Sciences Description: This project is designed to explore brain networks in Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD).

More specifically, we are examiningdynamic features of these networks by examining how they change in response to brain stimulation.This gives us a sense ofnetwork plasticity, that is, the degree to which networks are flexible or malleable in the autistic brain.During their first visit they undergo brain imaging with functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI) and also perform tasks which are sensitive to social cognition while in the scanner.This allows us to establish a target for brain stimulation in prefrontal cortex.

Subjects then return for two additional visits during which they undergo identical scanning procedures both before and after they undergo brain stimulation.Brain stimulation is done non-invasively using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS).Subjects receive stimulation to either medial or lateral prefrontal cortex at the final two study visits. Network plasticity is then compared between ASD patients and controls.Students do not have to have prior experience in research.

Basic knowledge of UNIX and Matlab is helpful.Students will gain a working understanding of fcMRI and rTMS, and may learn something about fcMRI analysis.Number of hours per week is variable but is expected to be on the order of 10.Eldaief can meet with the student weekly for mentoring.

Stipend funds are not provided but we encourage students to apply to the HCRP for funds if funds are needed or to register for research course credit.Eldaief at [email protected] May 1, 2017 Undergraduate Research Position, Biochemistry of DNA Replication, Dr.Johannes Walter Lab, Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, HMS Harvard Medical School, 260 Longwood Avenue, Boston, SGM Building;Description: The Walter lab studies the mechanism of vertebrate DNA replication using frog (Xenopus laevis) egg extracts as the model system.A key player in DNA replication is the CMG helicase, which unwinds DNA at the replication fork.

Recently, point mutations have been identified in CMG that cause a hereditary genome instability disorder in humans.The project will be to elucidate why these mutations cause human disease.Skills Required: prior molecular biology experience is preferred (PCR, cloning, protein purification, western blotting, insect cell tissue culture) Learning Outcome: the student will participate in planning and carrying out molecular biology and biochemistry experiments, will present results to the lab, and will participate in writing any manuscripts resulting from the work.

Time Commitment: full-time (40hr/wk) during the summer of 2017.

The candidate should also be available to work in the lab during the school year (10-20hr/week).Mentoring: The student will be mentored and supervised by a postdoc and will interact with the PI in weekly meetings.Students are also encouraged to apply for funding through the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit.Contact: Please contact Gheorghe Chistol (postdoc in Walter lab) at gheorghe [email protected] with a resume listing your experience, grades in coursework taken so far, and a cover letter describing your interest in biology.

Reference letters are welcome but not required.Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr.Corey, PhD; Department of Neurobiology, Harvard Medical School, Goldenson 443, 220 Longwood Ave, Boston/ Description of the project and duties: Within the inner ear are fast, sensitive receptor cells, working on a scale of microseconds and nanometers to convert the mechanical stimulus of sound into electrical signals that the brain can understand.

In recent years, this process has become better understood, as many proteins involved in the submicroscopic mechanotransduction complex have been identified.Our group in the Neurobiology Department at Harvard Medical School is working to understand the complex, with a combination of electrophysiology, 3D electron microscopy, biochemistry, and single-protein mechanics.We have an opening for one or two students to join this effort.These cells are called hair cells, for the bundle of fine “stereocilia” emanating from the top of each cell.

The mechanotransduction complexes are at the top of each stereocilium.Stereocilia are smaller in diameter than a wavelength of light, so we approach protein localization with antibodies conjugated to gold particles, viewed with several new methods in electron microscopy.Students will help us with sample preparation, and participate in data collection using focused ion-beam scanning electron microscopy and similar techniques to generate serial 3D EM data sets.Data sets will be aligned and reconstructed using both commercial software packages (Amira), and custom analysis tools.Data analysis will be done in-house using our 3D reconstruction workstation.

Project 2, we need to understand how the mechanotransduction proteins assemble into a functional complex.We use state-of-the-art biochemical and biophysical techniques such as biolayer interferometry, multi-angle light scattering, microscale thermophoresis and isothermal calorimetry, as well as more conventional methods like co-immunoprecipitation, to understand how different proteins interact with each other to form the mechanotransduction apparatus.Students will help us with DNA cloning, protein synthesis, and cell culture to generate a library of proteins.Students will then participate in the collection and analysis of biophysical and biochemical interaction data to generate an interaction model.Skills required: Project 1:familiarity with image-processing software is very useful; experience with tissue preparation for microscopy is a plus.

Project 2: laboratory experience with basic biochemical and molecular biological methods is very useful Learning outcome:Project 1:During the course of the work, a student will become familiar with the best tools currently available for 3D electron microscopy and will become an expert user of a 3D reconstruction software package widely used in biology and medicine, such as for CT and MRI.Project 2: During the course of the work, a student will engage in basic research with clinical relevance to inherited deafness, and will become proficient in state-of-the-art biochemical techniques.Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project: Summer: 40 hrs/wk.The project could be extended to a senior thesis or research course in the fall and spring Mentoring: Students will work with a senior postdoctoral fellow on a daily basis, and meet with Dr.Funding: A summer student could receive a stipend of about $500/week, but students are encouraged to apply for Harvard Research Fellowships.To apply: Email a note and resume to David Corey at [email protected] April 12, 2017 Undergraduate research opportunity in human neuroimaging of meditation, in the laboratory of Dr.Contact: Gaelle Desbordes, PhD, [email protected] , Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH)-Harvard-MIT Athinoula A.

Project description: Our research team (PI: Gaelle Desbordes,/~gdesbordes/) investigates meditation from a neuroscientific perspective, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and recordings of autonomic markers (cardiac, respiratory, and electrodermal).More specifically, we conduct longitudinal brain imaging studies of mindfulness and compassion training and its clinical applications to depression, chronic pain, and other conditions.We are located at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH)-Harvard-MIT Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging in Charlestown, Navyyard.The Martinos Center provides a highly collaborative and stimulating environment with exceptional training opportunities for students looking for research experience.

Required skills: Good interpersonal skills; basic computer skills.No laboratory or research skills are required, the student will learn these skills in the lab,Learning outcomes: Volunteers will receive training in, and provide help with, multiple aspects of clinical research - including running MRI scans, performing psychophysiological assessments (with electrocardiogram, skin conductance recordings, etc.), administering questionnaires, phone-screening and interviewing study participants, scheduling study visits, managing communications with patients, maintaining regulatory documentation in accordance with the Good Clinical Practice federal regulations and help with basic data entry and/or analysis.Length of the project: negotiable, but ideally volunteers work 16-24 hours per week or as much as he/she is willing to be involved for two semesters.Mentoring: the PI and any of the members of the lab will meet with the student regularly and will be helping the student to accomplish his/her goals.

Compensation: this is a volunteer position.Student are encouraged to apply for HCRP and other Harvard Research Fellowships or obtain a research or thesis course credit.To apply, email your resume to the PI together with a short statement of your goals and why you would like to join the lab to: [email protected] March 29, 2017 Undergaduate Research Opportunity, Prof.The Research Intern will initially shadow both clinical and basic laboratory researchers.

He or she will acquire the understanging about the research that is being conducted by both on-the-job learning and literature searching and reading.As the Research Intern becomes more knowledgeable and confident aboutthe research conducted in the lab, he/she will learn basic laboratory techniques and become intimately involved in the everyday workings of the lab.He or she will learn to perform histology and molecular analyses such as, western blotting, qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, etc on both animal and human skin specimens.He or she will also be involved in cell culture studies and downstream analyses, including flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry.Additionally, the Research Intern will have the option of working with the mouse models that are selected for in vivo studies.

Gradually, the intern will work independently and in collaboration with Research Assistants/Fellows on multiple ongoing research projects.The Research Intern will have the unique opportunity to work on our current projects, which aimto develop potential new therapeutic strategies for diabetic wounds and/or elucidate mechanisms of wound healing.Mentoring: The Research Intern will be directly mentored by a postdoctoral fellow in the lab with whom they will have mentorship meetings every other week.He or she will also be part of the weekly group lab meetings where they will be expected to participate and share their findings.Learning outcome: By the end of the opportunity, the undergraduate will have acquired a variety of laboratory skills including antibody staining, primary cell isolation and culture and animal work.

In addition they will have gained experience in scientific reading and writing, as well as making presentations.The length of the project is three months, but could be extended if needed.The student is expected to work 20 hours per week and the position is unpaid.Therefore candidates are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit.If interested, please mail your resume to Dr George Theocharidis at [email protected] General Hospital, CNY-149, 13 th Street, Charlestown, MADescription of the project and duties: Dr.

This project will investigate how physical properties of the tumor microenvironment affects breast cancer growth and treatment response.Interdisciplinary approaches, such as confocal and intravital multi-photon microscopy, 2D and 3D bioengineered culture models, microfluidic devices, flow cytometry, histology, molecular biology techniques and mouse models, will be used.Students will gain first hand research experience in breast cancer biology, tumor immunology and cell mechanics.Students are expected to be a part of our research laboratory full time over the summer, with the potential to stay over subsequent semesters for term-time research.

Skills required: Prior research experience preferred.Intermediate-level coursework or experience in molecular and cell biology recommended.Learning outcome: Students will learn and practice a multitude of cell biology, cancer biology, bioengineering, immunology and microscopy techniques as well as data analysis using MATLAB.Students will gain first hand experience in planning and conducting research experiments and analyzing data.Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project: Minimum 20 hours/week in summer, with potential to stay on during semester with negotiable hours.

Mentoring: Students will work close with postdoctoral fellow Dr.There will be weekly group meeting with PI.Funding: Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit.Contact Information: Interested students should email their CV/resume to Dr.

Lab Information: This is a unique opportunity to join the laboratory of Professor A.Iafrate is the Director of the Center for Integrated Diagnostics and a faculty in the Department of Molecular Pathology at the Massachusetts General Hospital.Center for Integrated Diagnostics is the lead clinical diagnostics center for cancer patients at MGH as it aims to genetically fingerprint patient tumors at various disease sites to guide targeted therapies, thereby enhancing the efficacy of drug treatments and supporting new clinical trial designs.Iafrate’s research lab, located in Building 149 of MGH at Charlestown, functions as the research and development arm of the CID.We aim to not only improve upon currently employed diagnostic assays, but to develop novel diagnostics tools.In addition to assay development, we also conduct functional studies of novel oncogenic events (e.SNVs or translocations) that are discovered on a weekly basis by CID ( Project Description: Prospective undergraduate researchers will be briefed on various projects currently conducted in the lab and will be given the option to select a project based on his/her scientific interest.

Some of the current projects include: improving upon Anchored Multiplex PCR technology ( /articles/nm.cfDNA) assays on NGS platforms, functional investigation of novel translocations identified in patients, and development of novel CRISPR-based diagnostics assays.

Pre-requisites: Ideal candidate should possess strong background in molecular biology and a working knowledge of Python and/or R.

Previous research experience would be helpful but not required for this post.Most importantly, candidates should possess strong interest in molecular diagnostics as it pertains to cancer patients.Learning outcomes: The student will develop and gain experimental laboratory skills, including experience in cutting edge molecular biology tools such as CRISPR/Cas9 and Next Gen Sequencing.In addition to lab skills, the student will also gain valuable research skills from study design to data presentations and scientific writing.

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Number of hours: Ideal candidate should be interested in a long-term (1+ years) commitment as part of a thesis project (e.

full-time during summer and part time during terms; negotiable hours).Funds: We have funds to pay a student’s stipend during the summer and possibly during the term periods, depending on the candidate .Funds: We have funds to pay a student’s stipend during the summer and possibly during the term periods, depending on the candidate.

Registration for research course credits may also be an option during the term research.from University of Cambridge) will be the direct mentor to the student and will be working closely with the student throughout his/her research period in the Iafrate Lab Harvard Forest Harvard University.from University of Cambridge) will be the direct mentor to the student and will be working closely with the student throughout his/her research period in the Iafrate Lab.John Iafrate will also provide mentorship during weekly lab meetings Harvard Forest Harvard University.

John Iafrate will also provide mentorship during weekly lab meetings.

Contact: Please send information regarding research interests, relevant experience, and completed courses to Dr.We look forward to hearing back from you!Summer Undergraduate Research Position, Gilmore Lab, MEEI, HMS We are hiring an undergraduate student to conduct a summer research project in our microbiology and microbial genomics lab at Harvard University freehostingprofits.com/case-study.php.We look forward to hearing back from you!Summer Undergraduate Research Position, Gilmore Lab, MEEI, HMS We are hiring an undergraduate student to conduct a summer research project in our microbiology and microbial genomics lab at Harvard University.The Gilmore Lab ( /) uses comparative genomics to study how bacteria evolve from commensals to multidrug-resistant, deadly superbugs.We are also working to develop new treatments for multidrug-resistant bacterial infections, and are currently focused on bacteriophages as possible novel therapeutics.

We are looking for a motivated undergraduate student to help us screen a large number of bacteriophages against different bacterial strains of the genusEnterococcus, in order to identify and analyze the phages’ bacterial host range.The position is for 10 weeks beginning June 1, and will pay $400/week.The Gilmore Lab is located at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary near the Charles MGH stop on the Red Line.The lab is also affiliated with Harvard Medical School and the Broad Institute. Qualifications: rising junior or senior with relevant laboratory research experience, i.

pipetting, sterile technique, making solutions, etc.Attention to detail, ability to follow instructions, and ability to work independently are also required.Prior experience working in a microbiology or molecular biology lab, computational skills (Matlab, Python, R), familiarity with genome sequencing, and an interest in bioinformatics and genomics are highly desirable, but not required. If you would like to apply for this position, please email a copy of your resume to Daria Van Tyne ([email protected] ) and Francois Lebreton (francois [email protected] ).

In your email, please explain your motivation for applying and detail your prior experience.Applications will be considered until April 15, 2017, and interviews will be conducted shortly thereafter.Learning outcome: scripting skills, data analysis, oral / written presentations Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project: minimum 4 hrs/week and commitment of at least 3 months; potentially negotiable Mentoring: Dr.Z llei will personally mentor the students, bimonthly meetings will be organized in order to discuss progress.Funding: Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit To apply: contact Dr Z llei ([email protected] ) with a cover letter and resume.

Posted March 15, 2017 Undergraduate Research Opportunity at Schepens Eye Research Institute/Mass Eye and Ear, Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School Description of Projects: 1.Exploration of novel approaches to the treatment of intraocular pathological angiogenesis.VEGF plays a central role in angiogenesis, the process by which new blood vessels grow from pre-existing vasculature, and its receptor VEGFR2 mediates almost all known VEGF-induced output, including neovascularization.New fragile vessels are associated with a number of eye diseases such proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) and neo-vascular age-related macular degeneration (wet AMD).Without timely treatment, the abnormal vessels in these eye diseases leak blood into vitreous, blur vision, destroy the retina and lead to blindness.

Inhibition of VEGF-stimulated activation of VEGFR2 with neutralizing VEGF antibodies (ranibizumab & bevacizumab) and a recombinant fusion protein with the partial extracellular domains of VEGFR1 & 2 (aflibercept) has become important therapy to treat abnormal angiogenesis associated with PDR and wet AMD.While these drugs can reduce vessel leakage and angiogenesis, continuous (and potentially harmful) ocular injections are required.In addition, there are number of patients with these eye diseases do not respond to the antiVEGF treatment.Thus, we are exploring a novel therapeutic approach to the intraocular pathological angiogenesis with an AAV-CRISPR/Cas9-based gene therapy.Investigation of the mechanism (s) by which growth factors drive biochemical and cellular responsesintrinsictoproliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR)as well asapplythisinformationtothedevelopmentofnewtherapeutic options to prevent PVR.In this research we have demonstrated that non-PDGFs in the vitreous engage their own receptors and thereby increase the level of reactive oxygen species.This change activates Src family kinases that phosphorylate PDGFR and thereby persistently trigger downstream signaling events such as P13K/Akt, which reduces the level of p53.Relaxing the p53 checkpoint potentiates the cell's ability to proliferate and survive, and facilitates the development of proliferative vitreoretinopathy.

In this project we will continuously investigate the role of the signaling pathway of PI3K/Akt/MDM2/p53 in the pathogenesis of PVR.

Skills required: No previous research experience is necessary.Learning outcome: Development of basic science laboratory skills: tissue culture, PCR, Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, work with animal models, etc. In addition, students will learn how to design experiments, write scientific papers, present the data, and analyze data.Consequently, the PI will co-publish a scientific paper with the student.Number of hours: negotiable Laboratory funding: The laboratory will fund all consumables, but there is no funding for a stipend.

Applicants are encouraged to apply for fellowships.Hetian Lei at Hetian [email protected] research position: Borderline Personality Disorder, McLean Hospital This summer is a fantastic opportunity for anyone interested in clinical psychology and/or psychopathology to do hands-on research work at the world’s leading research center for the study of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD).Apply to work with Lois Choi-Kain, director of the Gunderson Residence treatment facility for women with BPD, on a project investigating a low-cost method to assess reflective functioning in patients with BPD, which in recent years has become a focus of new research and is thought to be an essential feature across all psychopathology.Work for this project will take place at McLean Hospital at 115 Mill St.

The project will take place over eight weeks this summer.Hours are negotiable, but research assistants should expect to work 15-30 hours a week.The first step in this project, where RAs are most needed, is to transcribe Adult Attachment Interview audio recordings, so that the research team can test a new method of analyzing the transcripts that would be far faster and more efficient than current practice.Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit. Email your resume and contact info to [email protected] .Undergraduate Research Opportunity at MGH Department of RadiologyPI: Udo Hoffmann MD MPH Professor of Radiology, Harvard Medical School Division Chief, Cardiovascular Imaging Director, Cardiac MR PET CT Program Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital 165 Cambridge Street, Suite 400, Boston, MA 02114 Phone: 617-726-1255, Fax 617-724-4152 Description of Project and Duties: The Cardiac MR PET CT Program is a combined radiology/cardiology clinical research program at the Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School.The Program is a thriving multimodality multidisciplinary hub for patient oriented research focused on the translation and implementation of innovative advanced cardiovascular PET, MR, and CT imaging methods; including imaging of coronary atherosclerosis, myocardial structure and function, inflammation, and adipose tissues.

The goal of this project is to determine features in the imaging domain that are associated with cardiovascular risk factors, including smoking and diabetes.The intern candidate will be assisting the mentor in reading, analyzing, segmenting and labeling of coronary artery calcium in CT coronary images as a part of a large clinical trial.** Students will have the opportunity to interact with the medical faculty and attend clinical conferences (2-3 hour/week) to be exposed to the clinical environment.Skills Required: The student will be trained to read coronary CT image however, basic knowledge of human anatomy and familiarity with medical images and basic IT understating is preferred.Learning Outcome: Research Skills, data analysis methods, medical imaging analysis, clinical exposure, inter departmental presentations and poster presentations.

Commitment to Project: 12-15 hours/week (negotiable) for a duration of minimum of one semester with the opportunity to extend over the summer with 15-20 hours/week commitment.Mentoring: The undergraduate intern will be directly mentored by Dr.Udo Hoffmann (Director of Cardiac PET MR CT Program).Eslami will hold weekly one-to-one meeting to discuss the project details and progress.In addition, there will be a weekly departmental meeting to have further interaction with other members of the center and learn about their on-going projects.Funding: Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit.If you are interested or for further information, please contact Dr.Parastou Eslami at [email protected] with a paragraph describing your background and why you are interested in this position, along with your resume.

Posted Feb 22, 2017 Summer research opportunity for undergraduate students, Dr Barteneva (BCH-HMS) in association with Department Biology, School of Science and Technology, Nazarbayev University, Astana, Kazakhstan.Natasha Barteneva (BCH-HMS) and professor Ivan Vorobjev (SST, NU) Project 1 title: Assessment of phytoplankton biodiversity in unique Kazakhstani lakes, including Lake Balkhash and lakes in Korgalzhyn State Nature Reserve, included in the UNESCO world heritage list.The aim of the project is to assess phytoplankton biodiversity of unique Kazakhstani lakes using a combination of techniques such as flow imaging cytometry, light and fluorescent microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and next-generation sequencing.Located in the middle of Eurasian continent, Kazakhstan is a landlocked country encompassing a number of unique freshwater, brackish and saline lakes.

In spite of that, many of the Kazakhstani lakes are poorly studied and lack essential and reliable biological monitoring data.Phytoplankton communities are commonly used as biological indicators and their diversity and abundance provide information of the quality and state of aquatic systems.The undergraduate student may join the project in the summer for two months to participate in one of the following research components: Studying phycoplankton communities using fluorescent, light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).Application of imaging cytometry (FlowCAM and Imagestream X Mark II) to evaluate phytoplankton abundance and diversity.Microalgal cytometric analysis in the presence of endogenous autofluorescent pigments.

Imaging flow cytometry for phytoplankton analysis.Project 2 title: Analysis of mitotic blockade and apoptosis of normal and cancer cells under the action of microtubule inhibitors.

The aim of the project is to analyze behavior of mitotic cells under the action of microtubule inhibitors.Microtubule inhibitors like paclitaxel and vinorelbine are widely used in anti-cancer chemotherapy (against breast cancer, lung cancer, acute leukemia and some other) however the mechanism(s) of their action at the cellular level is still poorly understood.One of the problems is largely unpredictable effect of such treatments for a large cohort of cancer patients.The undergraduate student may join the project in the summer for two months to participate in one of the following research components: Studying mitotic progression under the treatments with microtubule inhibitors by high-throughput time-lapse microscopy using bright-field and fluorescence approaches.Analysis of cell proliferation and apoptosis under the treatments with microtubule inhibitors by imaging flow cytometry.

Balabiyev A, Kauanova S, Smirnova TA, Tvorogova AV, Vorobjev IA.Complex analysis of dose-dependent effect of microtubule inhibiting drugs on fibroblasts motility and mitotic progression.Molecular Biology of the Cell 26 (25): 920.Temporal Heterogeneity Metrics in Apoptosis Induced by Anticancer Drugs.Journal Histochemistry and Cytochemistry.

Multi-parametric imaging of cell heterogeneity in apoptosis analysis.Mentoring: mentoring will be mainly provided by graduate students Veronica Dashkova and Sholpan Kaunova, and Ph.

The students will also meet/discuss with PIs regularly.Learning outcome: we are looking for ambitious, heavy-working students, and poster presentation at the end of summer semester is expected outcome.Funding: Free housing and meals plan at NU, language lessons.

All project-related traveling expenses inside Kazakhstan will be covered.May require some external funding to cover flight tickets (air-fare) to Astana.Application: To apply, email your resume listing course work and prior lab experience, name and contact information of references, and a few sentences to explain why you are interested in the project, to Dr.Applications will be reviewed on rolling basis.Contact information: Natasha (Natalie) Barteneva, MD, PhD; Lecturer on Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School,Faculty Associate, Microbiology Initiative, Adjunct Professor, Nazarbayev University,[email protected] and Department: Jaya Rajaiya, Ph.D, Ophthalmology The cornea is the clear and foremost tissue of the eye that encounters all agents of the environment including infectious organisms.Corneal infection induces corneal inflammation, which can sometimes be severe leading to the loss of clarity, causing blurred vision, or even perforation and loss of the eye.

One type of corneal infection is epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC), commonly known as “pink eye”, and caused by adenovirus.Currently there are no specific treatments available for EKC, but a combination of antibiotic and corticosteroid drops are used to prevent secondary bacterial infection and subdue inflammation.We sought to identify specific host protein binding partners of viral structural proteins during infection, and validate their interactions through a technique called reverse proteomics.We cloned 3 adenovirus genes (penton base, pVI and pIIIa), and identified cellular binding proteins for pIIIa.We identified two high confidence interactors of pIIIa: ubiquitin-specific protease 9x (USP9x) and RAN binding protein 2 (RANBP2), that latter also known as nucleoporin 358, and a component of nuclear pore complex.

These host proteins may assist in nuclear export and virus assembly.Further investigation of molecular interactions during viral infection may uncover previously undiscovered roles for viral encoded proteins in the host cellular environment.A clear understanding of the cellular mechanisms, which contribute to corneal inflammation, would help us design specific therapies for the disease .Skills required: Wet lab experience will be a plus, but if not we will train the candidate.An interest in biological research and problem solving, and good communications skills are required.

Learning outcome – experience with (i) routine techniques such as cloning, western blots, real time PCR, to advanced experimental techniques including immune fluorescence microscopy (ii) designing experiments and data analysis (iii) gaining presentation skills.Mentoring – Mentoring will be primarily provided by postdoctoral fellows Dr.The student will also meet with the PI regularly.Compensation: Funding options will be discussed during interview process.Application: To apply, email your resume to Dr.Jaya Rajaiya Contact information: Jaya [email protected] Rajaiya, Ph.

D; Director Post Doctoral Training; Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School 243 Charles Street, Boston, MA 02114Tel: 617-573-4022PI:Leo A.Contact: leo [email protected] Description of Projects: 1.Cell death mechanisms underlying retinal toxicity.Our laboratory is evaluating the multiple concurrent cell death mechanisms underlying retinal toxicity due to commonly used medications such as tamoxifen and chloroquine.By understanding regulated cell death mechanisms including apoptosis, pyroptosis, and necroptosis, we may be able to develop methods to protect these medications as well as other degenerative diseases of the retina.Novel mechanisms of aberrant retinal angiogenesis.Using patient-derived fibrovascular membranes surgically removed from patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy, our laboratory has been able to discover novel molecular mediators of aberrant angiogenesis within diseases.Elucidating these new pathways may reveal mechanisms beyond vascular endothelial growth factor signaling, that may be potential targets to regulate pathologic ocular angiogenesis.Therapeutic agents for the management of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR).

PVR is a blinding complication of retinal detachment most commonly associated with eye trauma.This disease is characterized by growth of scar tissue beneath and over the retina.We have developed an in vitro assay using patient-derived PVR membranes to screen for potential drugs for the treatment of PVR.Additional work will attempt to understand the underlying mechanisms of PVR proliferation, growth, and migration, as well as mechanisms that can lead to drug resistance within these cells.Skills required:No prior research experience is necessary.

Learning outcome:Development of basic science laboratory skills: PCR, Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, work with animal models, tissue culture, ELISA, etc.Students will also learn how to design experiments, write scientific papers, present papers, and critically analyze data.Eventually, the PI would like to co-publish a scientific paper with the student.Laboratory funding:The laboratory will fund all consumables.

However, there is no funding for a stipend.Applicants are encouraged to apply for fellowships or apply for a research credit.Posted Feb 14, 2017 Undergraduate Research Opportunity to study the transcriptional regulatory circuit that combats the generation of osteoarthritis.

Location: Lassar Lab in the Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology at Harvard Medical School Osteoarthritis results from the degradation of the articular cartilage in joint tissue.We are probing the transcriptional regulatory circuit that both maintains the health of the articular cartilage and that blocks the degradation of this tissue.We are approaching this issue by identifying the transcription factors that maintain expression of key cartilage genes such as lubricin, which block degradation of this tissue.Techniques to be employed will be bioinformatic identification of lubricin transcriptional regulators and transgenic dissection of lubricin regulatory elements.We are looking for a highly motivated student interested in learning cutting edge molecular biology techniques to work in concert with a postdoc in my lab on this project.

Requirements: Completion of an introductory Molecular Biology laboratory course or 1+ years of prior laboratory experience.Goals of experience: Experimental design with a focus on good scientific method, data analysis and interpretation of results will be emphasized.Students will gain basic laboratory experience in a variety of laboratory skills including mammalian cell culture, RNA extraction, polymerase chain reaction, transfection of mammalian cells, cloning in mammalian expression vehicles, luciferase assays, gel electrophoresis, and bioinformatics analysis of transcriptional regulatory sequences.Start date: Spring 2017 semester and continuing at least into Spring 2018 (with potential for summer lab work).Commitment: 10-12 hrs/week during the term with the potential for summer work.

Student must be willing to commit 1+ years to master a variety of molecular biology/cell culture techniques.Funding: We will both provide funds to a qualified and motivated student and help the student obtain additional stipend support via Harvard undergraduate research grant opportunities (such as/research-opportunities and /faculty-aide-program) Contact: Interested students should contact Andrew Lassar (Andrew [email protected] ) with a resume listing their course work and prior lab experience (in or out of class).The laboratory is located at Harvard Medical School in the Longwood Campus.Posted Feb 14, 2017 Undergraduate research assistant opportunity for the Laboratory for Visual Neuroplasticity at Mass Eye and Ear Infirmary and Schepens Eye Research Institute in Boston, MA PI Name: Lotfi Merabet, OD PhD MPH Department: Laboratory for Visual Neuroplasticity, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and Schepens Eye Research Institute, Harvard Medical School Contact Information: Emma Bailin (617)573-3794 or emma [email protected] Location: 20 Staniford Street, 2 West Building, Boston, MA 02114 Project Description: The lab studies how the brain adapts to blindness and visual impairment.Major research focuses include brain imaging technologies (including MRI and EEG) to investigate structural and functional neuroplasticity.

The student will work closely with senior investigators in the lab on assessing performance in visually impaired adolescents using a variety of computer based software.Testing will be carried out at the laboratory as well as at collaborative sites in the Boston area.The student will be responsible for collecting and analyzing data under the guidance of senior investigators.Depending on computer proficiency and analysis skills, there is also the opportunity to participate in brain imaging experiments and data analysis.Skills Required: Ideal candidates will be pursuing a bachelor’s degree or equivalent in psychology or neuroscience.

An interest in working with people with disabilities would be highly desirable.Previous research experience in a neuroscience and or an experimental psychology lab would be ideal, but not required.Strong organizational and communication skills and attention to detail are an important must.The candidate should be self-motivated and able to solve problems independently while also being comfortable working with others.Applicants with a background in programming (e.

Unix, Python, MATLAB), statistical analysis software (e.R, SPSS, STATA) and/or neuroimaging software (e.Learning Outcomes: The position offers substantial research experience and potential for co-authorship on publications.The position is ideal for candidates looking to gain research experience in preparation for graduate level studies in neurosciences, psychology, education, or medicine in the future.

 The undergraduate student can expect to gain extensive experience in behavioral research methodology, psychophysical testing, statistical analysis, brain imaging, and study design experience.

Number of hours: Expected to work about 10 hours a week, depending on the current project.There is flexibility in the expected dates, but at least one year is required (or 2 semesters) and more than one year is highly preferred.Payment: No funds are currently available from the lab, but students are encouraged to seek external support.To Apply: Please send a CV and a cover letter to Emma Bailin (emma [email protected] ), with the subject line “Research Assistant position application”.The letter should describe your research experience (if you have any), interests and include why you think you would be a good fit for the lab.

Please also include the name and contact information of two references.Applications will be reviewed on rolling basis until the position has been filled.Undergraduate Research Position, Vaccine and Immunotherapy Center, MGH PI and Department: Mark C.Director Vaccine and Immunotherapy Center (VIC), MGH Bldg 149 (MGH East) 13 The aim of this project is to develop a new combination immunotherapy for cancer.

Skills required: Wet lab experience would be beneficial.Learning outcome: (laboratory skills, research skills: study design, data analysis method, presentations, scientific writing, etc.) The student has a duty to maintain a safe work environment, prepare solutions as requested and keep records in an assigned laboratory notebook.Assist with experimental setup, laboratory experiments, and data acquisition; perform image analysis and record data.Learn how to understand the principle of flow and mass cytometry, cell culture, animal model work and how to perform ELISA; WESTERN BLOTS; SDS-PAGE.

Learn animal handling, cryosectioning, immunohistochemistry, cell isolation, use of image analysis software, careful data recording.Give a PowerPoint presentation to lab members on the research process and results achieved.Hours: Either: Summer internship – 12 weeks full time Or: 10-12 hrs/week, student must be willing to commit 1+ years, as needed, to master a broad range of techniques.Mentoring: The appropriate VIC senior scientist will be assigned to the student and there will be weekly full lab meetings, team meetings and constant access to the specific mentor.Funding: The laboratory does not provide funding.

Students are encouraged to seek alternative funding support.Undergraduates can either enroll in a course credit at Harvard or apply for funding through the Harvard College Research Program.Contact: Interested students should contact Phoebe Ingram [email protected] and include a resume highlighting relevant experience as well as a brief description of their status at Harvard and two references.Posted February 10, 2017 Undergraduate research opportunity, Dr.Synho Do Lab, Laboratory of Medical Imaging and Computation, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School Description of the project and duties: Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI) has been launched in 2015 to promote development of effective tools to prevent disease and provide personalized treatments.

Precision medicine requires observation of all possible health related data, such as biological, environmental, and behavioral influences, which are generated by individual’s differences in genes and lifestyles.Our lab focuses on the development of the Radiology-Pathology-Genetic (R-P-G) data machine learning platform to implement the early stage cancer diagnosis and accurate treatment planning.The undergraduate researcher will actively play an important role to build essential components of the project: 1) digitalized big and high quality raw data repositories, 2) fast pre-processing and robust data retrieval system from secure storage, 3) intelligent algorithm to find an association map with self-learning capability, and 4) actionable information extraction and visualization of information.Skills required: No prior research experience is required.However, you must have some computer programming skills (Python will be preferred) Learning outcome: Research skills: study design, data analysis method, presentations, scientific writing, etc.

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project: Negotiable Mentoring: Dr.Synho Do will mentor students at least once a week.Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit.Email your Resume and cover letter to Ms.Catherine Park at [email protected] Department: Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital Contact information: Tel 617-643-0247, Ms.

Catherine Park at [email protected] Location: 25 New Chardon St.4 th Floor, Boston, MA, 02114 Posted January 27, 2017 Dissecting human -cell differentiation regulatory networks; Douglas A.Melton, Xander University Professor; Harvard Department of Stem Cell & Regenerative Biology Pancreatic -cells are essential regulators of glucose homeostasis whose dysfunction leads to diabetes.Diabetic patients could be cured through transplantation of new -cells, creating an urgent clinical need for their large-scale generation.To this end, our lab has recently developed strategies for generating human stem cell-derived -like cells (SC- ) that are glucose-responsive and mitigate diabetes in mice.

We are now looking for a highly motivated, independent, and committed student to help us identify the key genes and signals needed to obtain functionally mature SC- cells useful for replacement therapy.The ideal candidate would be a student primarily interested in Molecular/Developmental Biology who also has a general interest in human disease treatment.Requirements: Completion of an introductory Molecular Biology laboratory course or 1+ years of prior laboratory experience.Start date: Spring 2017 semester and continuing at least into Spring 2018.

Commitment: 10-12 hrs/week during the term.Student must be willing to commit 1+ years as needed to master a broad range of biological techniques.Contact: Interested students should contact Juan R.Alvarez ([email protected] ) and include a resume highlighting relevant experience as well as a brief description of their status at Harvard.

Summer Research in Panama, with Harvard Pfister Lab & Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute The aim of this project is to assess phylogenetic relationships between species of laboulbenialean fungi that occur on bat flies (Diptera).

Laboulbeniales are parasitic fungi that are microscopic in size and occur at the outside of the integument of arthropod hosts.Questions to be addressed include: How diverse are Laboulbeniales fungi on neotropical bat flies? Does morphological identification always match up with molecular data? Do bat fly-associated Laboulbeniales form a monophyletic clade in the order-wide phylogeny? This project is an excellent research opportunity for an undergraduate who wants to gain more lab experience and who is considering going to graduate school.Skills required: Some experience with DNA extraction protocols and PCR amplification techniques.Learning outcome: Molecular lab experience; fieldwork; advanced microscopy; concepts in evolution and speciation.There will be an opportunity to present at a Pfister Lab meeting.

Dates: June 1 - July 31 (flexible dates).Location: The research will take place in Gamboa, a small town that is only reachable by a single-lane iron and wood bridge.Many Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute facilities are available here, among them the Bat Lab.The Principal Investigator of this lab, and close collaborator for the project, is Dr.

Mentoring: The student will work directly with a fifth-year graduate student at the Pfister Lab, Danny Haelewaters.Applying for (external) support is required.Relevant publications: Haelewaters D, Gorczak M, Pfliegler WP, Tartally A, Tischer M, Wrzosek M, Pfister DH.Bringing Laboulbeniales into the 21st century: enhanced techniques for extraction and PCR amplification of DNA from minute ectoparasitic fungi.Haelewaters D, Pfliegler WP, Szentiv nyi T, F ldv ri M, S ndor AD, Barti L, Camacho JJ, Gort G, Est k P, Hiller T, Dick CW, Pfister DH.Laboulbeniales (Fungi, Ascomycota) ectoparasites of Central European bat flies (Diptera, Nycteribiidae): distributional data and host associations.available upon request Haelewaters D, van Wielink P, van Zuijlen JW, Verbeken A, De Kesel A.

New records of Laboulbeniales (Fungi, Ascomycota) for The Netherlands.Entomologische Berichten 72 (3): 175-183.Please email CV, unofficial transcript, brief description of interests, and one reference to Dr.Pfister ([email protected] ) and Danny Haelewaters ( [email protected] ).Summer research in the genetics of neuron shape, Dr.Maxwell Heiman lab, Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School and Boston Children's Hospital The aim of this project is to use genetic screens in C.elegans to identify factors that shape the nervous system.Questions to be addressed include, How do neurons extend dendrites of the correct length?How do neurons attach to the right neuronal and glial partners?What controls the specificity and positioning of neuron-glia attachments?This project would be an excellent research opportunity for an undergraduate who is considering going to graduate school.

Examples of relevant publications include: Yip Z.(2016) Duplication of a single neuron in C.

elegans reveals a pathway for dendrite tiling by mutual repulsion.(2015) The many glia of a tiny nematode: Studying glial diversity using Caenorhabditis elegans.* (2015) Computer-assisted transgenesis of C.(2009)DEX-1 and DYF-7 establish sensory dendrite length by anchoring dendritic tips during cell migration.

Previous experience with molecular biology methods.Learning outcome: Methods for genetic manipulation of C.

elegans; advanced microscopy; concepts in developmental biology and neurodevelopment.There will also be an opportunity to present at a Heiman lab meeting.

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Expected dates are Jun 1 - Aug 14, with some flexibility available.Mentoring: The student will work directly with a fourth-year graduate student, Elizabeth Lamkin.

Applying for external support or course credit is encouraged, but a stipend can be made available Help me write college aeronautics thesis professional Turabian British 6 hours 73 pages / 20075 words.Applying for external support or course credit is encouraged, but a stipend can be made available.

Please email CV, unofficial transcript, brief description of interests, and two references to [email protected] CLS 14047, 3 Blackfan Cir, Boston MA The goal of this project is to develop biosensors to measure the concentration of the signaling molecule cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) inside individual bacterial cells.c-di-GMP is involved in regulating several important cellular processes, most notably biofilm formation.Biofilms are the leading cause of infections acquired in hospitals and biofilm-based chronic infections are a growing cause of concern for modern medicine Harvard Forest, Harvard University. Since 1907, the scientists and students at Harvard Forest have explored the ways biological, physical, and human systems interact to change our earth..Biofilms are the leading cause of infections acquired in hospitals and biofilm-based chronic infections are a growing cause of concern for modern medicine.This project will provide fundamental understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying biofilm formation in bacteria.

The undergraduate researcher will work independently on all aspects of this exploratory project, including finding relevant literature, selecting promising approaches, developing strains, setting up imaging apparatus, and carrying out experiments to measure c-di-GMP concentrations in cells under various conditions.The ideal candidate will be independent, self-driven, and interested in learning about the biophysics of bacterial locomotion and sensing.Previous research experience is not required but exposure to bacterial genetics and/or molecular biophysics is a plus.Familiarity with MATLAB (or other similar programming languages) is beneficial.Through this project, the student will gain experience in study design, bacterial genetics, methods in single molecule biophysics, data analysis, presentations, and scientific writing.

The student will be closely mentored by postdoctoral researcher Dr.Weekly research meetings and biweekly lab meetings will be held to track the research progress.Expected duration of the project is 1 term, with an option to continue in the following terms.

Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships.Interested candidates should send their resume, and a cover letter highlighting their background and interests to Dr.Posted January 5, 2017 The bumble bee species Bombus impatiens is a crucial pollinator of many Angiosperm species in North America.Bumble bees are highly social insects that live in small colonies (hundreds of individuals).

While worker bees often appear interchangeable, our recent work has shown that individual workers within colonies show strong individual differences in behavior, i.Our lab uses computer vision and machine learning techniques to study the collective behavior of bumblebee colonies and the role of individual personality in social insect colonies.

We’re also interested in how environmental stressors such as pesticides affect individual behavior and group success.

/ Project opportunities: -Short-term project (2-3 months).The student should be available to begin work in January 2017.The project will be woven into a master thesis on the evolution of personalities in bumble bees.-Long-term project (Spring semester 2017, potentially extensible over Summer, extension into senior thesis research also possible).The project will mainly focus on the impact of neonicotinoids (pesticides) on the foraging behavior of bumble bees.

Students may also have the opportunity to develop an independent research program.Skills required: The student is expected to be highly motivated, committed and reliable, as well as eager to learn about research in behavior.Prior research experience preferred, but not required.Students with a foundation in biology or ecology are encouraged to apply.Number of hours: 5-10 hours per week Funding: The laboratory does not provide funding.

Students are encouraged to seek alternative funding support.Undergraduates can either enroll in a course credit at Harvard or apply for funding through the Harvard College Research Program.Harvard Global Health Institute, Harvard Initiative on Global Health Quality, Cambridge, MA Duties & ResponsibilitiesThe Harvard Global Health Institute (HGHI), through its strategic initiative on quality, The Harvard Initiative on Global Health Quality (HIGHQ), is committed to advancing our understanding of how to improve quality within diverse health systems.HIGHQ partners with health systems to design policies and metrics that drive high-quality healthcare and advance the field of global health quality through 1) advising partnerships, 2) research, 3) policy and 4) education.Our vision is that health systems everywhere are intelligently designed to improve population health.

The Research Assistant will assist in a seminal project to benchmark the state of healthcare quality globally.In collaboration with others, the Research Assistant will conduct thorough reviews of the scientific, peer-reviewed literature on topics such as the quality of care for acute myocardial infarction or stroke in hospitals and the quality of care for hypertension and diabetes in the outpatient setting.The Research Assistant will abstract data from these studies into a large database and will be involved with data compilation and visualization.00 per hour;Schedule: 15-20 hours per week Basic Qualifications: Medical or public health school students preferred, although exceptional undergraduates with an interest in medicine or health policy will also be considered.

Additional Information: This is a 3-6 month appointment with the possibility of renewal.Contact: Interested candidates should submit their resume to HGHI Executive Director, Ethlyn O’Garro at ethlyn [email protected] .Undergraduate Research in Computational Biology opportunity, Duraisingh lab, Harvard School of Public Health Malaria impacts human evolution in geographical areas where the disease is endemic.Examples include the sickle cell trait, a mutation in a hemoglobin gene that inhibits growth of the malaria parasite in host cells, and the duffy-negative trait, which renders host erythrocytes resistant to invasion by Plasmodium vivax by preventing expression of the Duffy antigen on their surface.An undergraduate student will assist us in identifying novel factors that might be under selective pressure from malaria by leveraging the thousand genomes project ( ) and the human exome project ( ).

The thousand genomes project provides whole genome sequences of individuals from around the world from including regions where malaria is, and is not, endemic.The human exome project provides broader and deeper sampling for the subset of the human genome that is expressed as protein.Enrichment of specific genetic variants in parts of the world where malaria is endemic may reveal novel factors involved in host/parasite interactions.This strategy was employed to provide evidence that CD55, a potential novel malaria receptor, is under selective pressure (Egan et al.No prior research experience is required.We are looking for a student with a demonstrated interest in computational problem solving and a basic understanding of biology.The student will develop skills in the unix operating system, the R programming language, and in the use of online bioinformatics resources.CONTACT INFORMATION Undergraduate Research in Molecular & Cell Biology opportunity in the Duraisingh Lab, Harvard School of Public Health With 250 million infections and 500,000 deaths attributed to malaria each year, malaria is a significant burden on public health in the developing world.

The blood stage of infection is responsible for all symptoms of disease.In the Duraisingh lab we investigate the influence red cell physiology has on the virulence of blood stage malaria.Upon infecting a host red cell, the malaria parasite need the host red cell to remain intact for the two days required for the parasite to produce progeny that will initiate the next round of blood stage infection.A growing body of evidence suggests that the malaria parasites excessive digestion of host hemoglobin and new permeability pathways (NPPs) are responsible for maintaining the osmotic stability of the infected red cell.The impact host red cell physiology has on the osmotic stability of malaria infected red cells is not known.

It is our aim to identify red cell factors that determine the osmotic stability of malaria infected red cells.This project has the potential to reveal a novel host antimalarial mechanism as well as therapeutic targets for the virulent blood stage of malaria infection.We are looking for a student who is interested in gaining research experience (or expanding existing experience), can commit 5-10 hours per week in the lab, and has good communication skills.Skills required – No previously laboratory experience required.An interest in biological research and problem solving, and good communications skills are all that are needed.

Learning outcome – experience with (i) advanced experimental techniques including immune fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry (ii) experimental design and trouble shooting and (iii) data analysis and presentation.Mentoring – Mentoring will be primarily provided by postdoctoral fellow Dr.

Formal meetings with Martha will occur once a week.The student will also have the opportunity to engage with PI Dr.Compensation – Compensation options will be discussed during interview process.CONTACT INFORMATIONGeneral description: In dark caves in which landlocked marine layer flows beneath a freshwater layer, there are generally few animals.

Yet, some of these extreme caves have inexplicably large biomasses of shrimp and members of the Remipedia, a rare crustacean class discovered in 1981.The cave system studied in the Cavanaugh Lab by postdoctoral researcher Joey Pakes is one of these systems having mysteriously high densities of crustaceans.Why and what is feeding all of these animals? Microbes!!Field and laboratory studies by Pakes combine both microbial and animal evolutionary ecology to better understand the relationships between microbes and crustaceans in these largely inaccessible habitats across Mexico and the Caribbean.In addition, new projects in the lab have developed around United States freshwater cave systems.Selected students will be trained by and work closely with Postdoctoral Fellow Joey Pakes, who received her AB at Harvard (Winthrop) and PhD at UC Berkeley.

Techniques used in the laboratory are shared by many environmental, microbial and medical laboratories.Past students who have worked with Pakes have gone on to graduate school in biology, veterinary, and medical schools.Most recently, her Harvard mentees have presented work at Harvard, Radcliffe, and international conferences! Selected students may work on one or a combination of the following projects: 1)Genetic and morphological Biodiversity of cave micro-eukaryotes:Requires a.preparing slides of micro-eukaryotes (e., protists) with fluorescent dyes and/or b.using PCR and sequencing to assess the biodiversity of cave organisms.2)Biogeography of cave crustaceans: Requires a.DNA extraction, PCR, sequence generation for analysis of shrimp phylogeography and rates of dispersal.Work in excel, ArchGIS/GOOGLE EARTH, genbank and literature searches are likely.(The student may also learn phylogenetic and population genetic analysis.) 3)Are cave environments stable? A micro-climate study: Requires a.Using your programming knowledge to analyze long term environmental data collected in underwater caves.4)History of Cave Science: While cave diving has only been popular since the 1970s and safe diving practices were not developed until much later, caves has been appreciated as biological hotspots since the Voyage of the Beagle.

This project aims to combine early and recent research to answer questions about known caves like, Where are they? What geologic and chemical characteristics do they share? Who lives inside of them? a.Help us create and catalogue the history of cave research using library science in person and on line.Then, mine data from these historical works to put current knowledge into context.Specific qualifications applicants should have Availability to Spring Semester: For projects 1 and 2: Life Sciences 1a or Life and Physical Science A required.

Coursework covering the following topics is desirable but not essential: evolution, invertebrate biology, microbial diversity, biological oceanography, geochemistry, or ecology.For projects 3 and 4: Have you used google scholar, pubmed or Hollis for a class assignment or taken CS50? Anyone with these skills and an interest in caves is encouraged to apply!For all projects, a background in one or more of the following would be preferred: Excel, ArchGIS, Adobe product suite, a programming language (e.This commitment includes an hour of weekly meeting and an hour to read literature or prepare new protocols at home.If interested: Please send [email protected] an email with subject line “Interest in Undergraduate Research.” In the body of the email, please let me know why this research interests you and how your background might help our research team.Should you care to see some pictures of an anchialine cave animals and learn more about Joey's PhD field research, check out this narrated slideshow hosted by the UC Museum of Paleontology/blog/archives/1731.Undergraduate Research Fellow in Alzheimer’s Disease Lab, MGH Our research uses advanced brain imaging technology to the understand degenerative changes that occur in the brain of patients with Alzheimer’s disease.

Skill required: Students are expected to be self-motivated and eager to learn about neuroscience research.No prior research experience is required.Students with a foundation in biology, chemistry, physics, psychology, neuroscience, computer science, or engineering are encouraged to apply.The undergraduate student fellow can expect to gain valuable knowledge in clinical research, data analysis methods, and study design in addition to presentation and laboratory skills.The Principle Investigator will work with the student to determine appropriate mentorship, which will be tailored to the interests and needs of the student.

The length of the project and number of hours per week dedicated to the lab are negotiable.To apply, please send your resume and a brief description of your scientific interestedto the study coordinator at [email protected] and [email protected] David Salat Undergraduate research opportunity, Division Endocrinology, Diabetes and Hypertension, BWH.Students will gain an understanding of the normal physiology of puberty and reproduction through the use of various basic and translational models to understand the underlying mechanisms leading to disordered pubertal timing and altered reproduction.Current projects focus on the mechanism of Makorin Ring Finger Protein 3 ( MKRN3), the first loss-of-function mutation described in children with central precocious (early) puberty, by Dr.

Using a recombinant adeno-associated virus overexpressing Mkrn3, the goal of the current project is to attempt to delay pubertal onset in prepubertal rodents and cause suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in postpubertal rodents.In vitro studies using various cell lines will also be used to understand the impact of Mkrn3 on other important neuroendocrine players in the HPG axis.Goals of experience: Experimental design with a focus on good scientific method, data analysis and interpretation of results will be emphasized.Students will gain basic laboratory experience in a variety of laboratory skills including mammalian cell culture, RNA extraction, polymerase chain reaction, gel electrophoresis, western blot, immunohistochemistry as well as experience in rodents through animal handling and husbandry, reproductive phenotyping, tissue collection and surgical procedures.

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project: The number of hours students are expected to work is flexible.The length of the project can be modified to fit the needs of the student, it can range from a semester to a full year commitment.Kaiser provides mentoring and oversight for the overall project while direct mentoring will be conducted by a post-doctoral research fellow (Stephanie Roberts, MD).Does laboratory provide any funds to pay student’s stipend? No, students are encouraged to either enroll in a course credit at Harvard (see your concentration advisor) or apply to student fellowships (HCRP, PRISE, etc.

) Application: To apply send resume directly to Dr.Chief, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Hypertension Brigham and Women's Hospital Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School 221 Longwood Avenue Endocrinology, Diabetes and Hypertension, BWH.Kaiser’s laboratory research focuses on understanding the neural network controlling puberty onset.Puberty is triggered by the central increase in secretion of a neuropeptide, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), which stimulates pituitary gonadotropin secretion necessary for activation of gonadal function.Our group recently reported loss-of-function mutations in the makorin ring finger protein 3 ( MKRN3) gene in association with central precocious puberty.

The aim of this project is to determine the role and mechanisms of action of Mkrn3 in puberty onset.For these studies, we are using a combination of in vivo and in vitro approaches.A genetically modified mouse model will be used to determine the physiological role of Mkrn3 in the regulation of puberty onset.The mechanism of action of Mkrn3 will be studied by using hypothalamic-like neurons differentiated from genetically manipulated human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs).Skills required: No prior research experience is required.

Learning outcome:The student will be involved in both in vivo and in vitro approaches to answering important biological questions.They will learn basic molecular and biochemical techniques (PCR, RT-qPCR, Western blot analysis, immunohistochemistry), mammalian cell culture techniques (including hiPSCs, hiPSCs cell differentiation) and reproductive physiology analysis in mice.They will also learn how to design a research experiments, analyze data and present their results.They will have the opportunity to attend weekly lab meeting and Endocrine division conferences.Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project: Number of hours students are expected to work is flexible, depending of the student’s availability.

Mentoring: The student will be directly mentored by a post-doctoral research fellow (Lydie Naule, PhD) on a daily basis and will receive overall supervision by Dr.Does laboratory provide any funds to pay student’s stipend? No.Students are encourage to apply for research course credit (see your concentration advisor) or research fellowships (HCRP, PRISE, etc).Application: To apply, email your resume to Dr.

Chief, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Hypertension Brigham and Women's Hospital Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School 221 Longwood Avenue Undergraduate research opportunities in translational genetics and neurodevelopment (Yu Lab) The Yu lab (Division of Genetics and Genomics, Boston Children's Hospital) is seeking talented undergraduate students interested in genomics and neurobiology research.

Our group studies the genetic and neurobiological underpinnings of autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders.For example, we have conducted the largest screen to date for gene knockouts in humans that lead to autism, mining whole exome and genome data from tens of thousands of autistic individuals and controls.Students will have the opportunity to work on a range of projects, ranging from in silico bioinformatics and gene hunting to bench-based neurobiological studies of candidate genes (involved in nitric oxide signaling, axon guidance, neurotransmitter signaling) arising from these analyses.We are also conducting a clinical translational research study of the use of genome sequencing in the neonatal intensive care unit.Skills required: Projects are available for students with experience and/or interest in genetics, molecular biology, neurobiology, bioinformatics/computational biology, and translational medicine.

Techniques include molecular biology, biochemistry, cell culture, neuronal culture, in situ hybridization, ChIP-seq, genome engineering, next-generation sequencing (NGS), NGS analysis and interpretation.Students will be mentored directly by a postdoctoral fellow and supervised by the PI.Interested candidates can send a cover letter, resume/CV, and two references to Dr.Students are encouraged to apply for course credit, work-study, and fellowships; laboratory covers summer stipends not covered by Harvard summer research awards.

Salaried positions may be available depending on experience.Yu, MD, PhD Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School | Division of Genetics and Genomics, Boston Children's Hospital | Member, Kirby Program in Neurobiology | Associate Member, Broad Institute Learning outcome:The student will have access to the state-of-the-art facilities in the Center for Nanoscale Systems (CNS) at Harvard University and learn different techniques for manufacturing biomedical devices at micro and nano scale , the skills learned will include clean room operations, photolithography, reactive ionic etching, deposition techniques, and metrology techniques such as scanning electron microscope, etc. The student will also acquire research skills such as study design, numerical simulations with the Finite Element Method to study the electromagnetic fields generated by the microscopic coils, presentations at weekly meetings, scientific writing of manuscripts in biomedical engineering journals, etc.Bonmassar will be mentoring the HU student through weekly mentorship meetings.Location: AA Martinos Center, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129 Hours: Negotiable Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Neurodegeneration, Dr.Walsh lab The Walsh lab has been at the forefront of studies on the role of soluble protein aggregates in neurodegenerative disease.

Currently, we are working to establish a knowledge base that will allow the development of rationally designed interventions to slow or halt Alzheimer’s disease.In line with this, the student will have the opportunity to work on a number of exciting and translational projects aimed at understanding nervous system degeneration from a proteinopathic standpoint.Responsibilities include, but are not limited to, cell culture and aseptic technique, recombinant protein purification and aggregation, agarose and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, plate-based immunoassays, immunochemistry and protein chromatography.Skills Required:There are no specific skill requirements per se, but prior wet lab research experience and/or an understanding of basic biochemistry is preferred.

However, all applications will be considered.Learning Outcome: With the aid of senior research staff, the student will be expected to i) establish proficiency with various cell, molecular and biochemical methods, ii) develop experimental design skills, iii) analyze and interpret quantitative and qualitative data, iv) organize and present data in a coherent manner, and v) work closely with other students and scientists in a collaborative environment.Time Dedication: The student is expected to spend a minimum of 12 hours/week in lab.The duration of the opportunity will depend on a number of factors and is open to discussion.Mentor: The student will have the opportunity to work closely with postdoctoral fellows on a day-to-day basis.

Additional weekly meetings with the PI will also be organized.Compensation: Funding is not available during the school term, but stipend may be available for students who wish to work during the summer months.Contact Information: Interested students should submit a resume and statement of interest to Grant Corbett, Ph.Please include ‘Undergraduate Research Opportunity’ in the title of your message., Associate Professor of Neurology Laboratory for Neurodegenerative Research Brigham & Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School Building for Transformative Medicine (10002O) 60 Fenwood Road Projects involving fruit flies ( Drosophila) to study neurological diseases including neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), schwannomatosis and Alzheimer’s Disease are available.Will include maintenance of fly stocks and genetic crosses, microscopy, molecular biology and protein techniques including: DNA/RNA isolation, PCR and sequencing, western blotting.Skills required: some laboratory experience is preferred (molecular/protein and/or Drosophila genetics), but full training will be given.Must be self-motivated with attention to detail and excellent verbal and written communication skills.Learning outcome: students will learn laboratory skills in genetics, dissection, microscopy, DNA and protein analysis, statistical analyses, preparing data for publication Hours are negotiable and flexible – depending on the experiments being conducted at the time.

Minimum expected: 2-3 hours, 2-3 days a week.Length of project: minimum of 6 months but can be extended.Mentoring: the PI will be responsible for mentoring.Will meet formally on a weekly basis to discuss project, planning, data etc.and PI will be on hand throughout working day.

Will also be expected to occasionally work with other lab members (to learn/demonstrate techniques and discuss experiments).Funding: possible stipend, but student would be strongly encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit.James (Jim) Walker Massachusetts General Hospital Undergraduate Research Opportunity in the Laboratory of Ronald Neppl, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, HMS In healthy individuals, lean muscle accounts for 38 – 54% and 28 – 39% of total body mass in men and women respectively.

These ranges are quite broad and are dependent upon multiple factors including age, physical activity level, overall health, and genetic makeup.In addition to its clear role in movement and locomotion, muscle is also a reservoir of glucose acting to buffer blood-glucose levels, a source of lactate and alanine for gluconeogenesis in the liver, as well as a major endocrine organ regulating the metabolic demands of adipose tissue, brain and bone.An ever increasing body of evidence links physical activity and the maintenance of lean muscle mass with a decreased risk of chronic disease as well as premature morbidity and mortality.A gradual loss of muscle mass with advancing age is physiologically normal.

However, in a subset of individuals its increasingly rapid progression results in Sarcopenia, a major contributor to Frailty Syndrome.

Effecting upwards of 5 million Americans per year, Cachexia is characterized by an excessive loss of muscle mass and increased mortality.It is now recognized as a complex metabolic condition associated with an underlying illness or chronic disease such as renal failure, cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, and AIDS. The Neppl Research Group is focused on the molecular regulation of skeletal muscle homeostasis in health and disease.Our overarching goal is to understand how ncRNAs control the essential processes of myogenesis and hypertrophic growth, and how perturbations in these processes may lead to a disease state resulting in muscle atrophy.Using traditional biochemical and molecular biology techniques, in vivo and in vitro model systems, as well as next generation RNA sequencing, we seek to discover and understand the biological roles these ncRNAs play in the maintenance of lean muscle mass.

Skills Required: No prior research experience is required.Only a desire to learn and work as a part of a team.Students with basic laboratory skills (e.DNA or protein gel electrophoresis, buffer preparation, etc.

Hours: The number of hours per week is negotiable.Learning Outcome: The student will learn laboratory and research skills, project and study design, as well as data analysis methodologies and presentation skills.Mentoring: The student will have a weekly mentorship meeting with the PI, and will work closely with Postdoctoral Fellows in the lab.The PI has an open door policy, and actively performs experiments with the Fellows.

Required information: Please email your resume/CV along with a brief statement regarding your interest in musculoskeletal research and what you hope to learn.The PI will work with you and the appropriate institution (e.Ursula Kaiser Laboratory, Brigham and Women's Hospital An increasing body of evidence has demonstrated that several G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)–ligand pairs are critical for normal human reproductive development and function.Patients harboring genetic insults in either the receptors or their cognate ligands have presented with reproductive disorders characterized by varying degrees of GnRH deficiency.

These disorders include idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) and Kallmann Syndrome (KS).Mutations in PROKR2 have been identified in patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism or Kallmann syndrome, characterized by GnRH deficiency.However, the molecular mechanisms through which these mutations cause disease are not fully understood.Several of these mutations are in amino acids in the 4 th or 6 th transmembrane domain of PROKR2, which are highly conserved among G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and have been shown to impair cell surface trafficking, often causing misfolding of the receptors.The mechanisms involved in post-translational processing and trafficking of GPCRs from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the cell surface are not fully understood, but it has been shown that chaperone proteins play an important role in the intracellular trafficking of GPCRs.

We hypothesize that mutations in PROKR2 that interfere with cell surface expression have impaired interactions with chaperone proteins and instead may interact with proteins targeting them to degradation pathways.The goal of our studies is to identify and compare the proteins involved in PROKR2 intracellular trafficking by performed immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of wild-type (WT) PROKR2 and trafficking defective mutants.Abreu AP, Noel SD, Xu S, Carroll RS, Latronico AC, Kaiser UB.Evidence of the importance of the first intracellular loop of prokineticin receptor 2 in receptor function.G protein-coupled receptors involved in GnRH regulation: Molecular insights from human disease.Learning outcome: Students will have the opportunity to learn basic laboratory techniques including but not limited to mammalian cell culture, western blot, immunoprecipitation, bioimaging, and molecular cloning.

In addition, they will learn how to design scientifically rigorous research experiments and perform data analysis.Students will also be given the opportunity to present their work at our laboratory meeting and/or scientific meetings.Number of hours students are expected to work is negotiable.Yong Bhum Song, a postdoctoral fellow in Dr.

Kaiser’s lab, will serve as the primary mentor.He will meet with the student on a daily basis.Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP, PRISE or register for a course-credit with their concentration advisers.The student should submit their contact information as well as their curriculum vitae to Dr.

Ursula Kaiser at [email protected] and/or Yong Bhum Song at [email protected] .

Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School Undergraduate Student Internships for 2017 at the Center for Stem Cell Therapeutics Imaging The Center for Stem Cell Therapeutics Imaging at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School in Boston, MA is seeking highly motivated undergraduate students interested in oncology research.Our research is based on simultaneously targeting cell death and proliferation pathways in tumor cells in an effort to eradicate both primary and metastatic tumors in the brain using therapeutically engineered stem cells.We have engineered different adult stem cells types to release (i) pro-apoptotic proteins to specifically induce apoptosis in tumor cells; (ii) anti-proliferative nanobodies (ENb) to inhibit tumor cell proliferation; (iii) anti-angiogenic proteins to target blood vessels supplying the tumor; (iv) oncolytic viruses to induce viral oncolysis; and demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of these engineered stem cells both in vitro and in vivo.

Inherently linked to our tumor therapy paradigm, we employ fluorescent/bioluminescent imaging markers and optical imaging techniques to track the fate of stem cells and tumor cells in real time in vivo.In an effort to translate these therapeutics into clinical settings, we have developed and utilized immuno-deficient and -competent mouse tumor models that mimic clinical settings of primary tumors and their secondary micro-invasive deposits in the brain.We offer an excellent training program in a collaborative research environment including molecular biology, stem cell biology, gene delivery to brain tumors, and imaging disciplines.The student interns will be working under guidance from a senior lab member on a research project and will be supervised by the Director.Requirements: Applicants should be currently enrolled in an undergraduate program within the Greater Boston area, with experience in one or more of the following techniques: stem cell biology, gene cloning, viral vector construction and/or animal surgeries.

The student interns are expected to commit at least 15-hours/week during regular academic year and apply for full-time summer internship.They will receive training in various scientific areas including but not limited to experimental design, conduct, data interpretation and analysis, writing scientific reports and manuscripts.Interested candidates can email the Center Director, Dr.Khalid Shah with a copy of their most recent resume and two letters of recommendation at [email protected] .Location: Brigham and Women’s Hospital Department: Neurosurgery Research Duration of Internship: 2 years Undergraduate Research Assistant, Laboratory of Bacterial Biophysics, Rowland Institute at Harvard In nature, bacteria often move through complex media like soil or mucus which are very different from the aqueous solutions typically used in laboratory experiments.

The aim of the project is to learn whether the different kinds of motility appendages of bacteria are advantageous for traversing specific kinds of media.The undergraduate researcher will use a newly developed automated imaging setup to quantify how colonies of bacterial with different types of motility appendages explore new territories consisting of various complex media in Petri dishes.Duties include preparing bacterial cultures and Petri dishes with complex media, setting up automated imaging experiments, and analyzing the resulting data.Skills involved in the research are:-culturing bacteria Projects are related to looking at environmental toxins effect on the microbiome, using honey bees and wasps.Skills required: Comfort with insects, ideal candidate would have microbiology or computer programing experience.

Learning outcome: opportunities to present work at scientific conferences as well as author scientific publications Number of hours students are expected to work: 10-20hr/week Does laboratory provide any funds to pay student’s stipend? yes To apply send CV and a cover letter regarding your interest in science and science research as well as highlighting their longterm career goals.Undergraduate Research Assistant, Laboratory of Systems and Behavioral Neuroscience, Rowland Institute at Harvard Our lab is primarily focused in studying learning and memory using innovative imaging and optogenetic techniques in larval zebrafish.In particular, we are looking for a student interested in understanding how an animal learns to assemble complex motor sequences.Expectations and Responsibilities: Responsibilities can include designing and conducting behavioral and imaging experiments, as well as zebrafish genetics and husbandry.The student will be immersed in a multidisciplinary lab that utilizes expertise from a diverse array of fields, and given ample opportunities to expand his/her knowledge and skills.

To provide mentorship and support, each student will be paired with either a postdoc in the lab or work directly with the Principal Investigators.Ideal candidates are driven, independent and interested in obtaining a deeper understanding of the neural basis of learning and memory.Programming skills and previous lab experience are preferred, but not required.Learning outcome: all aspects of scientific work including laboratory skills, scientific writing and presentation Students are expected to work at least 8 hours per week during semesters.Partial funding possible; candidates encouraged to apply for HCRP, PRISE, etc.

Please send your CV and one-page motivation letter to Dr Jennifer Li ([email protected] ).Please specify whether you are interested in a volunteer or work-study position.

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Drew Robson [email protected] , / Undergraduate Research Assistant, Laboratory of Renewable Energy Materials, Rowland Institute at Harvard To developing highly efficient artificial photosynthesis system No prior research experience required.

Learning outcome: problem-solving, oral presentations, writing Number of hours students are expected to work: depends on the student's schedule, very flexible Partial funding possible; candidates encouraged to apply for HCRP, PRISE, etc.To apply send Resume and cover letter would be fine Best websites to purchase thesis aeronautics high quality Business 9 days Harvard A4 (British/European).To apply send Resume and cover letter would be fine.

Undergraduate Research Assistant, Laboratory of Excitonic Materials and Devices, Rowland Institute at Harvard Upconversion is the process of converting low energy (infrared) light into high energy (visible) light.This has a number of very useful applications, from building higher efficiency solar cells, to better imaging cameras, to infrared and night vision, to three dimensional displays 14 Feb 2014 - Roxanne Ardeshiri Summer Research Program '10 Mentor: Benjamin Baiser Project:  Community Ecology of  Sarracenia pupurea  Pitcher Plants College and major: UC Berkeley, Class of 2012 Molecular Environmental Biology B.S. What you miss most about the Summer Research program:  The forest  .

This has a number of very useful applications, from building higher efficiency solar cells, to better imaging cameras, to infrared and night vision, to three dimensional displays.

Critical to the process, however, are the materials used.Here, the undergraduate researcher will examine a set of materials to find the most successful combinations and build effective devices.The student is expected to have experience in a scientific lab and good scientific hygiene freehostingprofits.com/thesis/need-to-buy-an-aeronautics-thesis-american-business-platinum-no-plagiarism.The student is expected to have experience in a scientific lab and good scientific hygiene.Specific skills, including but not limited to spin coating, thermal evaporation, packaging, lasers, spectrometers, etc, will be taught by the PI.Learning outcome: The student will learn how to plan and execute a scientific experiment, from design to fabrication to testing and compiling the results.

The student will present their work to the PI and others and gain experience with technical presentations.

The student will publish their results, if applicable, in a peer-reviewed journal with assistance from the PI.5-10 hours per week, January - May with extensions over the summer possible.Partial funding possible; Candidates encouraged to apply for HCRP, PRISE, etc.Submit a resume and cover letter to [email protected] .Mentor: Dan Congreve, [email protected] ; PI Dan Congreve, [email protected] , Rowland Institute, Undergraduate Research Assistant, Laboratory of Nanoscale MRI, Rowland Institute at Harvard The Tao Lab seeks structure-property relationships in nanoscale, heterogeneous matter through the development of single-nucleon magnetic resonance imaging.

On this journey toward direct, 3D imaging of atomic structures, we are compelled to lift the performances of force-sensing and magnetic gradient-generating systems to new heights.We expand the tool boxes of nanofabrication and material synthesis, for the existing arsenal of sample preparation methods usually proves inadequate to support this nano-engineering tour de force.This multidisciplinary adventure will continue to enable discoveries and understanding of new physical phenomena and chemical processes.A detailed description 10h during term time and full-time during summers and winter semesters.Partial funding possible; candidates encouraged to apply for HCRP, PRISE, etc.

Please email a CV along with a brief statement explaining why you would like to join this particular lab, which skills you bring along, which you would like to learn, and what your long-term career plans are.We are especially interested in your extracurricular interests as well! Contact: PI: Ye Tao [email protected] 100 Edwin H.Land Blvd, Cambridge, MA 02142 Undergraduate research opportunity, Department of Ophthalmology at MEEI-HMS Description of the project and duties: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) affects more than 1.7 million individuals in the US and it will reach 3 million by 2020.Current therapies can improve vision only in some patients with advanced AMD; unfortunately, there is no effective therapy that prevents disease progression in patients with early disease or genetic predisposition.

Our aim is to create a cell-based model using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC)- derived retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells carrying AMD risk variants in complement genes.The mutations will be generated by genomic engineering with CRISPR/Cas 9.So the student will learn this technique, which includes cloning and molecular biology techniques. The student will also learn cell cultures, specifically iPSC cultures.Our final aim is to discover the primary mechanisms activated by the combination of aging and genetic variants in complement genes in patients with early AMD.

Skills required: No prior research experience is required.Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors are encouraged to apply Learning outcome: you will learn typical laboratory skills: cell biology and molecular biology skills (including genomic engineering, stem cell cultures and primary cell cultures), and research skills: study design, data analysis method, presentations, scientific writing, etc.Also, you will have the chance to attend interesting lab meetings and lectures from international researchers.Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project: this is an ongoing project, so the student can join us for a variable amount of time (at least 3 months).Mentoring: The student will be under the supervision of Dr.Pierce will be available eventually as a mentor.Students are encouraged to apply to HCRP, other Harvard fellowships or register for a course credit.

Email your resume and a cover letter to rosario [email protected] .Rosario Fern ndez Godino, Instructor in Ophthalmology Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Ocular Genomics Insitute- Harvard Medical School, 243 Charles st, Boston, MA Undergraduate research opportunity, Kirby Center for Neurobiology, HMS Project duties: The goal of this project is to develop new viral based tools that remove the need of transgenic animals and eventually open up experimental possibilities in higher vertebrate species that are currently impossible.The workflow currently consists of adeno-associated virus production, injection of virus into mice by tail vein, perfusion of mice, dissection and tissue section of brain and spinal cord, immunofluorescence staining of sections, and confocal microscopy of stained samples.In the coming months we hope to expand experiments into areas of flow cytometry, DNAse hypersensity screening and next generation sequencing.

No prior research experience is required.Learning outcome: Depth of involvement is entirely up to the individual.Students can participate in any of the procedures currently involved in these experiments that they may be interested in gaining expertise.For example a range of techniques are involved including viral production, histology, microscopy and data analysis.If cell type specific enhancers elements are identified, functional experiments could also be undertaken for a more in depth project (ie.

examine how stimulating labeled neurons effects animal behavior).A motivated student could also undertake projects to set up new techniques to apply to these experiments like sample clearing and whole brain imaging by light sheet microscopy, for example.Opportunities for practicing scientific writing and presentation would be available and strongly encouraged for students that wish to continue in academic research in their future.Working hours are flexible but would need to be at least 5 hr on most weeks but more hours would certainly be available.Length of the current iteration of this project is expected to be at least 1 year, but ‘next generation’ techniques are currently being designed for future experiments to reach the overall goal.

Mentoring: The primary mentor for this project is Dr.Philip Williams, and Instructor in the lab.He has over 17 years of laboratory experience and has strong expertise in histological and microscopy techniques, as well as a depth of knowledge about both developmental and degenerative neurobiology.The lab has lab meetings once a week on Friday mornings that students are encouraged to attend if they do not conflict with coursework.

Project meetings are scheduled every few months.

The laboratory can provide a stipend for interested students.Application: Please send a brief description of what your scientific interests are and what you hope to achieve through undergraduate research to: [email protected]@Principal Investigator: Dr. Zhigang He, Department: Neurology Research Kirby Center for Neurobiology, 13060; Center for Life Sciences; 3 Blackfan Circle, Boston 02115 Posted November 4, 2016 Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Gordon Center for Medical Imaging, Athinoula A.Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, MGH The Sepulcre lab focuses on brain imaging studies aiming at the understanding of large-scale brain networks implicated in human cognition and neurodegenerative disorders.We also devote a substantial part of our work developing cutting-edge network methodologies for different brain imaging modalities such as functional connectivity MRI and PET imaging.

We currently have several line in which students can enroll depending on their interest, including working with functional connectivity MRI in blind children, PET tracers and MRI in Alzheimer disease, fMRI of language networks and the developing of graph theory analyses to get a better understanding of the relationships of the brain networks.No laboratory skills are required, the student will learn all the skills needed in the lab, also no prior research experience is needed, just enthusiasm.Learning outcome: Depending on the project the student wish to enroll he will learn how to design a study, write a proposal, process data and any laboratory skill that would be needed for the work.Number of hours students are expected to work: As much as he/she is willing to be involved.Length of the project: is variable, but if data is already collected it takes a 3 months for the analysis and 3 more for further elaborations.

Mentoring: the PI and any of the members of the lab will be helping the student to accomplish his/her needs.Lab meetings are help every other Friday, but the PI's door is always open for any questions or concerns.Compensation: this is a volunteer position.Student are encouraged to apply for HCRP and other Harvard Research Fellowships or obtain a research or thesis course credit.To apply, email your resume to the PI and a small statement on why you would like to join the lab as well as the students expectations.

[email protected] Contact: Jorge Sepulcre MD PhD Asst Professor of Radiology, Harvard Medical School Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Gordon Center for Medical Imaging Athinoula A.Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital Mind/Brain/Behavior, Harvard University 149 13th St, Suite 5.209, Charlestown 02129 Undergraduate Research Opportunity – Laboratory for Affective and Translational Neuroscience, McLean Hospital Volunteer positions are available in the Laboratory for Affective and Translational Neuroscience (LATN), at McLean Hospital, directed by Diego A.LATN is part of McLean’s Center for Depression, Anxiety and Stress Research, which embraces a multi-disciplinary approach to improve our understanding of the psychological, environmental, and neurobiological factors associated with affective disorders ( /).Among our current research projects are an exploration of the psychological and neurobiological traits associated with resilience; an assessment of the role of early adversities such as maltreatment and trauma as precursors to depression and anxiety; and investigation of the cognitive and emotional processes that contribute to incentive-guided decision making, emotion regulation, and psychopathology.Responsibilities: Volunteers will participate in all phases of our research utilizing multiple methodologies such as MRI, fMRI, EEG, and behavioral testing, to study emotional and cognitive processing in both healthy and psychiatric populations.Volunteers will assist with recruiting, interviewing participants, behavioral and cognitive testing, and administration of EEG and MRI experiments.Volunteers will also work with LATN researchers to analyze data and prepare results.

Expectations and Qualifications: Volunteers work 10 to 15 hours per week for two semesters, and may apply for course credit in PSY 910r or Neurobio 98r.Candidates must be highly motivated and reliable.Both undergraduate students and recent college graduates can be research volunteers.Supervising Professor: Diego Pizzagalli, Ph., Professor of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, is the supervising professor.Pizzagalli is a Board of Honors Tutor member in the Psychology Department at FAS.Location: This lab is located at McLean Hospital, in Belmont MA, which is easily accessible via the T (a 25-minute bus ride from Harvard).McLean is the principal psychiatric teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School, and is ranked as the nation’s #1 Psychiatric Hospital in the U.

To Apply: Please visit the lab web site at / /about-us/current-openings to download an application form, and then send the completed form along with a copy of your CV to Dave Crowley at [email protected] .Undergraduate research opportunity “Aggression in the Fruit Fly Fight Club”, Department of Neurobiology, Harvard Medical School Our laboratory studies aggression using a fruit fly model system.

The studies link quantitative behavioral experiments with powerful genetic methods in explorations of how higher-level aggression is generated in the nervous system.We are interested in having 1-2 undergraduate students work with us part time (possibly for academic credit) during the academic year and full time during summers.While we are mainly interested in students looking for a senior honors thesis project, but will consider all applications.Article: Alekseyenko OV, Chan Y-B, Fernandez MP, B low T, Pankratz M and Kravitz EA (2014) Single serotonergic neurons that modulate aggression in Drosophila.

Skills required: We prefer students who have had introductory Neurobiology and Genetics courses.Laboratory experience is helpful but not required.Learning outcome: Hopefully an honors thesis in a concentration field.Detailed understanding of state of the art genetic methods applied to the understanding of an important biological problem.

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project: These are negotiable during the academic year.Sophomores and Juniors are encouraged to apply and the ultimate goal will be an honors thesis in a specialty area.Mentoring: Student will be trained and working under close supervision of a post-doctoral fellow at start.Then student will carry out project on his/her own with guidance and input from lab head and other members of lab.

There are weekly laboratory meetings that all laboratory members attend during which ongoing research of lab members are presented.Compensation: Students are encouraged to apply for various Harvard Funds for salary during summers—Laboratory covers all summer stipends that are not covered by Harvard summer research awards.During Academic year, students are encouraged to take concentration Research Classes for academic credit.Kravitz with contact names for recommendation letters.

Contact: Harvard Forest Research Since 1907, the scientists and students at Harvard Forest have explored the ways biological, physical, and human systems interact to change our earth.Outreach Harvard Forest builds bridges between scientists, decision makers, media professionals, and the general public to address complex ecological challenges. Harvard Forest offers courses, internships, faculty research opportunities, and day visits and retreats for the Harvard community.Events at Harvard Forest Applications are now open for the 2018 Harvard Forest Summer Research Program, an opportunity for college and university students across the U.to participate in 11 weeks (May 21-August 3, 2018) of paid, independent research with mentors from Harvard and other leading institutions.How will climate change affect New England forests over the next century? According to a series of new studies from HF Senior Ecologist Jonathan Thompson's lab, the answer is a mixed bag.In some respects, climate will exert an even greater impact than we thought: longer growing seasons will mean more tree growth and carbon storage.In other ways, climate impacts are likely to take a backseat to other factors, like the forests' continued recovery from colonial-era deforestation.in the Fisher Museum, national conservation leader Rand Wentworth will offer a free public seminar on best practices for leadership in the complex process of conserving land.The event is open to the public, and especially geared towards community leaders, landowners, conservationists, and students.August 2, 2017 This summer I am working under Sydne Record and John Grady’s project on seedling dynamics.I chose this internship to get more of a feel for the ecological field that I was introduced to a few years ago, and to continue research in Sydne’s lab at my home institution.

The aim of my project is to understand seedling population dynamics, with respect to abundance and growth rates, within Harvard Forest’s 35 hectre megaplot.Colleen (my research partner) and I have randomly set up fifty 1 m 2 pvc plots across the megaplot, and have located, tagged and measured the height of all stems that have more > July 6, 2017, by Jerilyn Jean M.Calaor “Welcome to Boston,” a voice over the airplane intercom announced.Already 7,955 miles away from home, I still had an hour-long car ride ahead of me.I fought through heavy eyes as the city skyscrapers blurred into towering trees.

Finally, we turned onto a dirt road, and the 22 hours of travel to Petersham came to an end.Stepping out of the car into the cold night, it was clear I had left the warm summer breeze, sandy beaches, and vibrant blue ocean of Guam behind.Soon after, we visited where I would be spending most of my working day – the Harvard Farm.As I took in the sea of more > June 30, 2017, by Alina Smithe Imagine a sea of green grass swaying in the wind, sprawling mountains in the distance, cows browsing at their leisure.This is probably not the view that comes to mind when you picture Harvard Forest.

But here at the Harvard Farm, an abandoned golf course on the outskirts of the forest that is now maintained as agricultural grassland, ecological research extends beyond the trees.Though forests gather the attention of most conservation efforts in New England, grasslands also offer vital but fleeting ecosystems.Most grasslands originated from the clearing of forest for agricultural purposes, more > July 12, 2016, by Melinda Paduani of the Disturbance Dynamics Duo Consider the major events that you have experienced throughout your life.Some people keep mementos and souvenirs to remember the places they have been to or take photos to look back at what they saw; others only have their memories.Trees, on the other hand, “write their stories” in their rings.

The patterns that they form serve as a visual history of extreme weather, insect infestations, growth cycles, and many other details that are revealed upon closer inspection.I will admit to being the type of person who believed that science was confined to carefully outlined experimental methods more > June 28, 2016, by Molly Wieringa The first thing I would have anyone know about me is that I’m in love with the color green—the green of leaves and grasses and the edge of the sunset.It’s a color with a thousand shades and tints, a color that dances with light and seems strangely alien in any setting but the natural one.Luckily, there’s a lot of green in the woods, so for me a summer at the Harvard Forest falls somewhere on the spectrum between ‘this is just too cool to be real’ and ‘I get to spend the whole day outside?!?’ Fortunately, it is real, and I do get to spend about half my days out among the trees, more > August 4, 2015, by Cody Raiza Arriving to Harvard Forest from drought stricken California, I could have never imagined a place with so much water and lush green vegetation; precipitation so thick that the trees "rain" for hours after warm summer showers, rivers hugging every winding country road, and lakes bursting at the seams.

New England is a magical place where no one must consider turning their fluffy turf grass yard into a succulent garden or rockscape in response to the west coast drought.

Looking out a car window across a sprawling valley, one tries to comprehend how many hundreds of metric tons these trees more > August 3, 2015, by Josia DeChiara Biology is a 3D puzzle; an infinitely large logic game with the universe, made up of numerous rings, bars, and strings inexplicably intertwined.A scientist attempts to make sense of these knots, looking for patterns in the pathways.This summer, I have been trying to trace these connections in strings of DNA in hopes of uncovering the story of soil life after decades of experimentally-induced warming.In October of 2011, soil cores were taken from each of the three soil warming experiments at the Harvard Forest and immediately immersed in a bath of ethanol and dry ice.This precious, more > July 29, 2015, by Roxanne Hoorn Integration of the arts into ecology research seems like an idea whose time has finally come.

Unfortunately, nature doesn't seem eager to embrace this expressive movement in the form incorporated in my research: the painting of ants.Nevertheless, as part of our summer project, my research partner Cody Raiza and I would find a colony of our ant genus of choice and hunker down for a few hours of tedious ant-butt painting.Perhaps I should start by explaining why we painted the ants, or why we even care about ants at all.People don't seem to think much about ants and when we do, we're more > July 21, 2015, by Tess McCabe Ants work hard.In fact, a single leafcutter colony can consume more than the average cow .

But different ants work hard in different ways.Some will move seeds around, letting plants grow in new areas.Some will build vast underground tunnels that aerate the soil.I figure out what ants we're working with, and I figure out what ants we will be working with.Here at Harvard Forest and at Black Rock Forest , I am looking at how the numbers and types of species of ant has changed over time, and how they will change.more > July 3, 2015, by Katrina Fernald Harvard Forest is a place with history.Our home for the summer was originally built in the 1700's, on our second day, we visited a 400-year-old black gum tree, and the bowls in our kitchen probably date from the end of the Stone Age.

Harvard has owned this patch of forest in Petersham, Massachusetts since 1907, and the amount of research and data that has accumulated since then is immense.I first began to understand the importance of this impressive history on two field days last week to Pisgah State Park in Winchester, New Hampshire.An average day here at the Forest for me most more > June 26, 2015, by Harry Stone "You're bringing leaves and stem samples across the border?" the CPB (Customs and Border Patrol) Agent asks quizzically at our car.How to respond in a short answer? "For ecological research" was the meek reply we settled on, and with a grunt the agent pulled us aside for further questioning.This interaction occurred yesterday on my return trip from the University of Montreal Laurentides field station in Saint-Hippolyte about an hour and a half north of Montreal.

For some further background information, I had spend the last week in Quebec collecting samples from roughly 160 individual more > June 11, 2014, by Claudia Villar In the early hours of most summer mornings, our team of researchers trudges through the New England forest along a well-worn path, shaded by the young, light-green leaves of the oak, maple and birch trees above us.Equipped with backpacks overloaded with gear including measuring tapes, hard hats, clipboards, and hammers, we chat about our families, our hometowns, and our career goals; our conversations are often punctuated by exclamations and discussions about the funky invertebrates and fungi we encounter along the path.As we walk, the forest thickens around us.The ground more > July 10, 2013, by Justine Kaseman This summer at Harvard Forest, I am researching the top down effects of vertebrates on the ecosystem.We are using warming chambers which are about 10 feet in diameter and are heated up from 0 degrees to 5.

5 degrees celcius over ambient temperature.For our experiment, we have created 3 mesocosms, which are like tiny environments in five gallon buckets.Each mesocosm has leaves, a rock, and some treatment.The treatments are as follows: Soil Soil and invertebrates Soils, invertebrates, and a salamander The soil includes the first trophic in the ecosystem: microbes.The inverts are the more > June 26, 2013, by Amy Balint The past few weeks have had one thing in common: line after line of empty traps.

This summer, I'm studying rodents and other small mammals to find out what happens to them when eastern hemlock forests die off due to an invasive insect called the hemlock woolly adelgid.To determine which species are present and estimate their population sizes, fellow REU student James and I have been heading out to the forest in the evenings to set traps for them.The traps are Sherman live traps, which we bait with sunflower seeds and organic cotton wool.The next morning, our mentor Ally picks us up at 4: more > June 11, 2013, by Hannah Wiesner Laying out two tape measures to create a 22.5m square, my first field exercise this summer took place not within the Harvard Forest’s 3,500 acres, but instead on the lawn behind a residential cabin.We were learning to use a compass to place a stake at the NE, NW, SE and SW corners of the square, which is much easier to do in a yard where the only obstacles between you and your partner are inch-long blades of grass and not trees several meters in height.Creating exact plots is necessary for our project because we aim to recreate the plots that were set-up in 1937 and 1992 in more > June 7, 2013, by James Leitner I hear my alarm go off, 3:45am uhhhh.Time to get up and check the traps to see if we caught any rodents.My research project is seeing how the declines of the hemlock trees are affecting the amount of small rodent species like mice, shrews, voles, and flying squirrels.

Hemlock trees can grow more than one hundred feet tall and can live for hundreds of years.They provide homes for a lot of animals and insects, and are also a good food source for some animals that eat the leaves.Since they are so tall, they provide a lot of shade and make the area around more > August 1, 2012, by Andrew Moe This summer, along with my mentor Ed Faison , a research associate at Harvard Forest and ecologist at Highstead Arboretum in Connecticut, I have been working on a project investigating the impacts of herbivory by moose, deer, and porcupine on regenerating forests.

More specifically, we are interested in looking at regeneration within stands of eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis).

Here in New England, hemlock forests are under attack.The hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae), an exotic insect already responsible for widespread mortality of hemlock throughout the Eastern U., has arrived more > August 1, 2012, by Yvan Delgado de la Flor Eastern hemlock is a foundation species in eastern North America and plays a critical role in the local biota.This tree deeply shades the soil, creating a unique microclimate for some species.

Currently, hemlocks are dying rapidly due to the invasive woolly adelgid, a nonnative phloem-feeding insect, causing alterations to the understory microclimates.Hemlocks are being replaced slowly by hardwood forests.All of these changes affect the entire ecosystem and result in the local extinction of some arthropods; for example, some ants and spiders are very sensitive to changes in more > August 1, 2012, by Elizabeth Kennett 3:40am my alarm goes off.I adorn my headlamp, throw on some field clothes, tuck my pants into my socks, and climb into my mentor Ally Degrassi's truck.The afternoon before this we had been out to the Ridge block, one of our two.Each block consists of four hemlock forest treatments.The first two treatments are one plot that was logged out five years ago and is now full of young vegetation and the second is a plot in which the hemlocks within it have been girdled; killing the trees but leaving them standing, this was done to mimic the affect of the Wooly Adelgid, more > July 23, 2012, by Anne Cervas This summer, I am working with my mentor, Audrey Barker Plotkin , to study former plantations at the Harvard Forest.We are working in the field to record the growth and changing vegetation dynamics as the former plantations grow back as native forest after a century of plantation forestry.We are also combining data from the Harvard Forest Archives to the data we collect in the field to study the growth and composition of the plantation forests compared to the native second-growth forest.

Plantations were an important component of the Harvard Forest in the first fifty years after more > June 25, 2012, by Matt Combs and Katie Davis Ants with Matt Combs Melting wax, digging through sand, and orchestrating the spectacular deaths of entire colonies of ants - seems more fitting for a preschooler than an undergraduate student, working a full-time job.Yet somehow, fate has landed this college senior his dream job: spending the summer in a professional scientific setting while doing things even a little kid would find cool.I represent one-half of the Warm Ants team this summer, which is a long-term research project working to determine the effects of rising air temperatures on ant ecology.We take measurements every more > June 25, 2012, by Julia Brokaw and Vincent Waquiu We got out of the truck at one of our research sites and saw two older women painting a picture of the forested road in afternoon sunlight.It was a beautiful scene, but what the artists didn’t know was that they were surrounded by stressed, thinning, and sick hemlock trees infested with the Hemlock Woolley Adelgid (HWA), the invasive insect pest currently attacking Eastern Hemlock Trees.

Hemlock trees are a ‘foundation species’ of forests.They are long-living, shade tolerant conifers that usually grow in groups or are assembled with other tree species.Hemlocks contribute to more > June 18, 2012, by Jennie Sirota My project for this summer studies the extraordinary carnivorous pitcher plant, Sarracenia purpurea .I am working with Aaron Ellison and Benjamin Baiser on a newly funded research project that studies the widespread issue of tipping points.Tipping points are the change from one state to another.

These can occur in many different systems, such as in the atmosphere or even in the economy.While it is difficult to predict the changes, we study tipping points to attempt to prevent them from happening because it is energy and resource expensive to return from a change.To test tipping points, more > June 11, 2012, by Aubrie James and Kelsey McKenna This summer, we’re studying animal movement with Dr.Elizabeth Crone and some of her “Cronies” (lab members and affiliates): post-doctoral fellow Greg Breed , Harvard OEB graduate student James Crall, and research intern Dash Donnelly.We’re looking at how anthropogenic landscape changes and resource availability affect population dynamics in two different organisms: bumblebees and butterflies.

Since we’re both especially interested in morphological changes, we’ll sometimes stop fieldwork for a day and head out to the Concord Field Station in Bedford, MA where we’ll use high-speed cameras more > August 23, 2011, by Kate Eisen and Collette Yee A permanent plot study provides an amazing opportunity for ecological research because it allows scientists to observe changes over ecological time.While many studies take place over a few field seasons at most because of funding or other limitations, permanent plot studies allow scientists to ask questions that only be answered over years or decades by providing a larger window into the dynamics of a site or population over time.For this reason, permanent plot studies are also essential to studying organisms like trees that grow slowly and often live for a long time.At 42 years old, more > August 3, 2011, by Natashia, Michael, and Kevin The Warm Ants team is interested in examining the effects of climate change on ecosystem services, species interactions, and biodiversity.We are continuing monitoring of the open top heated chambers at the long term Warm Ants plot through monthly pitfall trapping, winkler sampling, vegetation surveys, and artificial nest investigation.

Check out a video we made describing the experimental design of the heated chambers! Michael is studying the effects of climate change on ant-aphid mutualisms.He wants to see how species interactions will change under artificially warmed conditions.The more > June 20, 2011, by Rachel Brooks Covered in mud, and smelling similar to the stagnant swamp I found myself surrounded by, I peer deep into the small cuplike leaves of the Sarracenia purpurea (Northern Pitcher Plant), a long-lived carnivorous plant.Contained in these delicate green and red veined pitchers (which have become my life for this summer) an entire detritus-based food-web thrives.This community, consisting of bacteria, protozoa, rotifers, and anthropods, is diversified with numerous endemic species that can only be found within this unique little niche.

Therefore, every morning, dripping in the cold early more > August 12, 2010, by Aleta Wiley In the final week of the Summer Research Program in Ecology for Undergraduates at Harvard Forest, all 33 students participated in the Student Symposium on August 11-12 in the Fisher Museum.Over a day and a half, all the students presented 15 minute talks to an audience comprising program mentors, university professors, Harvard Forest researchers, family members, and of course, their fellow students.As each student discussed his/her summer research, the audience was impressed with the diversity of projects presented ( Abstracts are available here ).Since Harvard Forest is an LTER (Long more > August 9, 2010, by Maddy Case and Joe Horn We have spent most of the summer traveling across New England to do field work at sites in Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Maine.At each site, we have been establishing permanent vegetation sampling plots for a long-term study comparing forest dynamics in managed and unmanaged forests.

We carry 2-foot pieces of steel pipe into the woods (3 lbs per pipe x 3 plots x 4 pipes per plot + 10 lbs for other gear = Wicked heavy), use them to mark the corners of 20x20 meter plots, and survey these plots for herb-layer species, saplings, trees, evidence of historical disturbance, and more > July 26, 2010, by Carlyn Perovich and Mickey Drott We have spent the summer happily crawling around in the forest, bruising ourselves under mountain laurel in pursuit of the holy Grail of our project, moose poop.We are studying the impact of deer and moose browsing on the regeneration of forests, specifically looking at hemlock and oak seedlings.This research is particularly important since the number of white tailed deer continues to increase, and moose recently reappeared in Massachusetts after being extirpated since the mid-19th century.All the same, you don't have to be very knowledgeable about forest life to know that moose don't more > July 7, 2010, by Meredith Kueny and Lianna Lee Lianna and I are working on the Simulated Hurricane Long Term Ecological Research project out on the Tom Swamp tract of the Harvard Forest.

As a part of this project we are collecting another year's worth of data and information on how the original trees are fairing as well as documenting new canopy regeneration and understory dynamics.

This summer specifically we’ve worked on recording the current status of the original trees, quantifying the amount of dead wood, mapping new trees that have grown to 5cm Dbh (diameter at breast height), analyzing leaf liter, and observing more > June 24, 2010, by Autumn Alexandra Amici and Anthony Rivera The overall goal of this project is to understand the effects of tree care practices on habitat for cavity nesting birds, primarily woodpeckers.Most cavity nesting birds seek out dead snags for creating a nest.As cavity excavators, these birds provide habitat elements for a suite of species and are therefore important for biodiversity.While the dead snags that are important for these cavity-nesting birds may go unnoticed in a preserved area, they can be hazardous in towns and cities.By assessing the prevalence of cavity nesting birds in snags throughout an urban to wild land gradient, more > June 15, 2010, by Roxanne Ardeshiri My name is Roxanne Ardeshiri , I'm an undergraduate at the University of California-Berkeley, and I'm studying the community ecology of Sarracenia pupurea Pitcher Plants with Benjamin Baiser at the Harvard Forest.

Because Pitcher Plants are essentially microecosystems, we are studying their community ecology to ultimately create model food webs for these will be measuring decomposition of prey (an ant) as a means of measuring the functionality of the system.This experiment will be conducted in the greenhouse, but all of the species we are using will have been collected more > June 14, 2010, by Adam Clark and Margaurete Romero The Warm Ants project consists of many mini projects taking place within the chambers.One of these projects is a 24-hour baiting, which means that we must observe which ants are attracted to tuna baits set out in the different temperature chambers for all hours of the day, on the hour.Two of us – Margaurete and Adam – took the night shift from 10pm to 6am, and encountered an unexpected visitor.While waiting near the shed to continue the data collecting, a large insect flew right into us, startling the stillness of the night.

As it landed, we were so surprised to see a large Luna more > June 10, 2010, by Adam Clark, Erik Oberg, and Margaurete Romero In their third week, the Warm Ants Triumvirate has dived into both the long term "Warm Ants" project and individual projects with a burning desire to elucidate the effects of climate change on ants.Each member is responsible for helping with the long term "Warm Ants" experiment which involves a monthly 24 hour baiting study and monthly pitfall trapping.In addition, each is responsible for his or her individual project involving ant nests, mutualism, and thermal tolerance.Daily tasks have varied from spending time in the lab identifying ants, sorting pitfall collections from previous more >